Kendra Steiner Editions

January 11, 2017

Alfred 23 Harth’s long out-of-print first KSE album MICRO-SAXO-PHONE III is now available as a digital release on Bandcamp!

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 9:49 am

We’re honored to be releasing new works from ALFRED 23 HARTH, and in the last seven years we’ve put out TEN releases from Mr. Harth (eleven, if you count the KSE 10th Anniversary album, on which he appears). Those albums are not permanently in-print and tend to sell out in 8-10 months.

In answer to many requests to make the earlier, out-of-print KSE-A23H albums available once again, we’ve worked with Mr. Harth to start bringing them back in digital editions, supervised by the artist.

The first to be reissued digitally is the first of his KSE albums, the much-acclaimed 2010 release MICRO-SAXO-PHONE III!

LONG OUT-OF-PRINT, BUT NOW AVAILABLE AGAIN AS A DIGITAL ALBUM

ONLY $7 US at Bandcamp

ALFRED  23  HARTH

“micro-saxo-phone. edition III”

originally KSE #175

recorded at LaubhuetteStudio, Moonsum, South Korea, 2010

total running time: 74:11 (17 tracks)

a23h-newer

You can purchase the album for only SEVEN DOLLARS here:

https://alfred23harthonkse.bandcamp.com/releases

Here are my original comments on the album, from the KSE website release announcement:

  In his new album MICRO-SAXO-PHONE. EDITION III, German free-music multi-stylist ALFRED 23 HARTH  has extended the vocabulary of the solo saxophone deep into the 21st century, creating a jagged, self-reflexive, multi-layered work that will stop listeners in their tracks.

   In jazz circles, the vocabulary of the solo saxophone is often traced back to Coleman Hawkins’ mid-40s recordings “Hawk’s Variations” and “Picasso.” In the late 60’s and early 70’s musicians as diverse as Anthony Braxton, Steve Lacy, Lee Konitz, and Sonny Rollins began re-investigating the possibilities 0f solo saxophone performance, opening the door for musicians ever since. Saxophonist ALFRED 23 HARTH is a man who has been on the cutting edge of the free-music world since his emergence onto the scene in the late 1960’s Germany, and his new album “micro-saxo-phone. edition III”  provides him a vehicle to use ALL aspects of his instrument, close-miking the keys and the reed, bowing the body, as well as using his virtuoso technique in passages that run the gamut from the lyricism of a Ben Webster to the highest chirps and the lowest rumbles, from clipped bursts to melting smears. In addition, he is multi-tracking new recordings, playing against older recordings of himself from the 70’s, weaving in strains of musique concrete and strands of spoken word into sound collages, and then using a Kaoss Pad to add further layers and to slice-and-dice the rest. “micro-saxo-phone.edition III”  is a truly unique work, one recorded especially for KSE by Mr. Harth just a few months ago. (2010 comments)

And here are Alfred Harth’s comments on the album, at the time of its 2010 release:

NOTES ON KSE #175   micro_saxo_phone, edtion III (MMX)

In early 2008 I again had started a kind of work-in-progress of solo recordings, called “micro_saxo_phone” which album title refers to the fact that I am using a sax of course + microphone (contact mics etc) of course for feeding devices as the Kaoss Pad or others + using the possiblities of my laptop. Together with this equipment I could give live performances which – for several reasons – did not happen often so far, though more probable within performances with others, as in the duo “Gift Fig” together with Carl Stone e.g.

“micro_saxo_phone, edition II”, CDR Laubhuette Production M10 from 2008 http://laubhuettestudio.blogspot.com/ gave an overview about what I was trying to state within the traditional course of my former solo recording on Side A of the LP “Plan Eden” from 1986/7 where I had begun to use electronic devices & effects in combination with solo tenorsax. On “msp,eII” I used baritonsax, tenorsax, alto, sopran, bassclarinet, breath & saliva noise multiphonics and even bowed the saxes’ bodies (con arco) during blowing and doing percussion with the instrument’s keys.

On “msp,eIII” I extended the language by means of using the sounds of the key springs which create a kind of meditative Asian feel and also by texts.
I searched for finding a way to voice words during blowing (e.g. at the beginnung of “doublespeak” and tracks 14,15), or underlined words (and other stuff) that I had recorded on cassette in 1972 (when I was 23) or by dubbing an interview with Japanese art photographer Nobuyoshi Araki which I had recorded in 1998 in a kind of double voicing. The same track also contains a sample of Korean gagok which is a kind of fake classical music – from some decades ago – made in Korea. “doublespeak” is the exception – as a composition – within the solos, as is “chukyo” using some of my eguitar recordings (as well as track 3). There are also some “classical” solos (without all effects or edits): track 9,
10 (underlined alto solo from 1972) and 13.

With that title “doublespeak” I also refer to George Orwell’s term “doublethink”, which means the ability to believe contradictory ideas simultaneously. And there are more doublespeak titles here, as “surplussed”, “twonky” (software designers’ jargon inspired by a 1953 sci-fi film starring Hans Conried and Gloria Blondell about a TV that is really an alien life form) etc. Other titles refer to themes and authors that I am also dealing with these days. “chukyo” is a dedication to Chukyo University in Nagoya, Japan, where I had been invited by the above mentioned Carl Stone to lecture and had met Fomal Haut, a great artist & pioneer of computer graphics.

Alfred 23 Harth
, December MMX


Thanks to Mr. Harth for working with KSE all these years and these TEN releases.

If this digital release succeeds, then we’ll see about bringing back some of his other out-of-print KSE releases digitally. Please purchase this classic for your A23H library and help us get this digital release series in action!

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