Kendra Steiner Editions

July 31, 2017

I NEED REAL TUXEDO AND A TOP HAT: words and pictures by Wyatt Doyle (New Texture)

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 3:51 pm

wyatt tuxedo

I NEED REAL TUXEDO AND A TOP HAT!

words and pictures by WYATT DOYLE

published by New Texture

available from Amazon in the US, Canada, UK, etc.–it’s cheaper to buy from your local Amazon outlet as it’s only local shipping, not foreign

 

Everyone has a dream. It might be something seemingly minor or insignificant to others; it might be something totally unrealistic that could never be accomplished in ten lifetimes. Every time I see a mom’n’pop business open in my neighborhood, I think of it as someone living their dream—-and when I see it go out of business in a year or two, a part of my heart breaks for the owners, as they tried to live their dream and it did not work out. But at least they got it off the ground for a while.

This collection of photography and short fiction by Wyatt Doyle is about dreams….dreams deferred, dreams denied, dreams laughed at by others, dreams that keep people’s spirits alive. Doyle’s earlier book of fiction, STOP REQUESTED!, took place on the public transportation system of Los Angeles, and thus included a number of homeless and transient individuals. I don’t know what the statistics are—-and even if I did, homeless people (like undocumented immigrants) are rarely counted accurately—-but from personal observation, there are certainly many more homeless folks here in Texas than there were, say, two years ago. The homeless and transient….and the closed-down businesses and abandoned things of the abandoned urban world they inhabit….are the focus of I NEED REAL TUXEDO AND A TOP HAT!

As always, Wyatt Doyle has an incisive and poetic eye as a photographer—-you can taste the atmosphere in every shot, and you can feel the environment in which these abandoned people and abandoned businesses exist. Some people in the suburbs may want a new car or a vacation to Mazatlan….the folks in this book want a safe place to sleep for the night, protected from the elements, and where the few personal belongings they have will not be stolen from them. And each night they must go on another quest to find that.

Wyatt Doyle also has an incisive and poetic eye as a fiction writer. While he certainly possesses all the good qualities of a Charles Bukowski or a James T. Farrell or a Hubert Selby or an Erskine Caldwell, he’s a better stylist than Bukowski, and he doesn’t have some of the personal baggage that a Farrell or a Selby or a Caldwell bring to a text. The writing is as clear, sharp, resonant, and deep as the photography. Each of the short literary pieces is character-based, and there’s not a wasted word or a false note. And each captures the dreams of the character, dreams which never die, dreams which can grow in any soil, no matter how distressed and bleak it may seem.

This is America, circa 2017; the characters depicted here in photographs and in fiction (and the book is mostly photography) are our brothers and sisters, and the environment they live and chase their dreams in may just be a mile or two away from where you are reading this….you may drive through the neighborhood on the way to or from work.

This is a beautiful book (9″ x 9″ square, with crisply duplicated and rich photographs), both in appearance and content. The human spirit cannot be snuffed out, even by the most corrosive circumstances, and I NEED REAL TUXEDO AND A TOP HAT! captures that spirit in both pictures and words. Wyatt Doyle has created a moving and unique work here, and I would not be exaggerating to say that on some level it could be viewed as the 2017 American equivalent to the classic Depression-era photography and literature hybrid LET US NOW PRAISE FAMOUS MEN by Walker Evans and James Agee. It’s a different world today, and different kinds of works are needed than in 1936. I think Evans and Agee would appreciate what Doyle has done here.

The book is available in both paperback and hardcover editions, and the hardcover contains some extra material. Either version is highly recommended. It’s the kind of work where, after spending time with it, I put it down, shake my head, and think, “this pretty much says it all.” What more could one ask from any artwork in any genre or format?

In the USA, you can get a copy at this link: https://www.amazon.com/Need-Real-Tuxedo-Top-Hat/dp/1943444137/ref=la_B003U61DSY_1_8?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1501537046&sr=1-8

Elsewhere, just search for the title/author at the Amazon website in your country. You’ll be glad you did.

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July 30, 2017

new solo percussion album from JOHN BELL, “Cambridge Surprise Minor and other peals” (KSE #377)

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 12:58 pm

JOHN BELL 2017 cover

JOHN  BELL

“Cambridge Surprise Minor and other peals” (KSE #377), cdr album

compositions for percussion, recorded in South Korea, New Zealand, and Laos

John Bell: vibraharp, glockenspiel, shell casings, gongs, scrap metal, bells,    piano frame, khong vong

$8 postpaid in the USA  (see below for foreign pricing and ordering instructions)

…………………..

Vibist, percussionist, multi-instrumentalist, and composer JOHN BELL is probably best-known outside of his home bases of South Korea and New Zealand for his collaborative work, both in concert and in the studio, with ALFRED 23 HARTH, including the much-acclaimed CAMELLIA album for KSE (#318, still available) and the forthcoming CAMPANULA, on the Moloko Plus label from Germany.

After working with Mr. Bell on CAMELLIA, KSE invited him to create a solo album, to further introduce him and his fascinating work to North American listeners. CAMBRIDGE SURPRISE MINOR AND OTHER PEALS is that album, and like Dane Rousay’s recent ANATOMIZE, it is an album of compositions for solo percussion. Along with the human voice, percussion would have to be the “instrument” with the deepest roots in antiquity and in the widest variety of world cultures. Percussion music can be created from the materials at hand, and that’s what John Bell does here on his new KSE album. While vibes, glockenspiel, and gongs are used, so are scrap metal and abandoned shell casings, as well as a piano frame and the ancient “khong vong” gong circles. These 13 sound paintings-in-percussion, suspended on the canvas of silence, resonate in many many ways….and I would suggest that in listening to this album (and I’ve played it dozens of times since getting the master) you try setting individual tracks on “repeat” to get deeper into them and also setting your player on “random” so you can hear the pieces juxtaposed in different combinations. It is a rich and complex yet deep and elemental series of pieces, an album I can’t imagine getting old. I asked John Bell for some comments on the album, and here is his reply (by the way, this lay-person mistakenly thought that the word “peal” referred simply to the ringing of a bell, the generic sound generated from a bell….how wrong I was….it is far more than that, and I would suggest you click on this definition of PEAL from Wikipedia before proceeding further here       ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peal ):

 

‘About 15 years ago I felt compelled to visit the peal of bells at St Matthews in the city Auckland (the second largest peal in New Zealand). I was lucky enough to be invited to their rehearsal on a Tuesday night, and even though I didn’t mention my family name, they invited me to enlist in the group of trainee bellringers. Despite the impressive sound I declined the invitation. I must have to blame my mother’s side of the family because, at that time I was somewhat repulsed by any slavish discipline such as precise rope pulling. 15 years ago I would never have contemplated spending even the one and a half days it took to record the title track of this album (a full length version of a common English peal). Bill Shute did me a huge favour when he asked me to record a solo album for KSE. Bill gave me nearly five months to send him the material.

 In the last twenty years I ve performed and recorded plenty of frenetic chime smashing, clappers flying around, and more recently lots of bowing and scraping in some free jazz ensemble or similar. So for this first solo album, I decided to explore the bell-ringing side of things,  limited myself to struck metal, only a tiny bit of bowing some metal on one track (  If once I was a bell ). There was also plenty of time to layer tracks and consider panning and mixing ideas.

 Bells are multi-faceted symbols and salient in many cultures. I have been living in South Korea for more than four years , and sadly there are no church bells anywhere near my house. Like most people in Korea, I live in a valley, nowhere near any of the large impressive temple bells, so have only heard one live once! The compensation for this is the prevalence of beautiful gongs in Korean traditional music. I was also lucky enough to be allowed to spend some time recording on  a set of khong vong at the national school of music and dance in Laos last year.

Thanks to Rod Cooper of Melbourne for showing me the simple idea of polystyrene as a reasonator box.

I hope everyone enjoys this album’

John Bell 30 July 2017

KSE is proud to present our second album of composition for percussion for Summer 2017 (the first one was by San Antonio percussionist and composer Dane Rousay), JOHN BELL’s CAMBRIDGE SURPRISE MINOR AND OTHER PEALS (KSE #377)

Be sure to grab this exciting and satisfying CDR album ASAP….

 

$8 postpaid in the USA  (see below for foreign pricing and ordering instructions)

NOTE: ALL CDR’s  ARE NOW PRICED @ $8.00, postpaid in the US.

OUTSIDE THE USA , one album is $18.00 postpaid, first two albums are $20.00 postpaid, then $8 each postpaid after that—sorry, but it now costs almost $14 US to send one CDR overseas….you save A LOT by buying more than one—in fact, the price on an order of two or more HAS GONE DOWN!

1 album= $18, 2 albums= $20, 3 albums= $28, etc. Thanks for your understanding of this. The Post Office now charges $14.50 to mail ONE cdr without a jewel box to Europe or Asia!

Payment is via paypal, using the e-mail address   django5722(at)yahoo(dot)com   . It might be helpful for you to also shoot me an e-mail telling me you’ve sent funds and what items you want…or if you prefer, tell me what books/cdr’s you want, and I’ll send you a paypal invoice.

FOREIGN KSE FRIENDS: we have a lot of great albums to use for your second album, costing only 2 dollars more (!!!) than one album, due to the exorbitant foreign postage rates, which are pretty much the same for one or for four or five cd’s. Take advantage of that and get John Bell’s previous album with ALFRED 23 HARTH “Camellia”, our new album of compositions for percussion from San Antonio’s DANE ROUSAY, the latest album by Ernesto Diaz-Infante “Manitas,” Alfred 23 Harth’s BERLIN ENSEMBLES, etc. See below:

OTHER CDR ALBUMS OF EXPERIMENTAL MUSIC (and more) PRESENTLY AVAILABLE FROM KSE:

KSE #371, SAMUEL DUNSCOMBE & TIM OLIVE, “Zanshi”

KSE #375, MASSIMO MAGEE & JAMES L. MALONE, “The Limits of the Possible”

KSE #373, DANE ROUSAY, “Anatomize” 

KSE #372, ERNESTO DIAZ-INFANTE, “Manitas” solo classical guitar

KSE #369, A. F. JONES, “FOUR DOT THREE TO ONE”

KSE #362, FOSSILS & BILL SHUTE, “Florida Nocturne Revisited”….new interpretations of Shute’s Florida Nocturne Poems

KSE #370, “KSE 11th ANNIVERSARY ALBUM” featuring newly recorded, exclusive tracks from members of the KSE family and friends: JEN HILL, VANESSA ROSSETTO, ERNESTO DIAZ-INFANTE, LISA CAMERON, BRIAN RURYK, FOSSILS, MORE EAZE, JOHN BELL, MASSIMO MAGEE, MATTHEW REVERT, STEVE FLATO

KSE #355 (CDR), MORE EAZE, “wOrk”

KSE #357 (CDR) SMOKEY EMERY / VENISON WHIRLED, “turning into”

KSE #363 (CDR) ALFRED 23 HARTH’s BERLIN ENSEMBLES

KSE #359 (CDR), TOM CREAN & MATT ROBIDOUX, “Blank Space”–cover art by Jennifer Baron

KSE #336 (CDR), ALFRED 23 HARTH, “Kepler 452b Edition”

KSE #351 (CDR), MASSIMO MAGEE, “Music In 3 Spaces”

KSE #350 (CDR) ANTHONY GUERRA / BILL SHUTE, “Subtraction” KSE  reissue of album originally released in 2011 on Black Petal Records, Australia 

KSE #335 (CDR album), REVEREND RAYMOND BRANCH, “Rainbow Gospel Hour…On The Air!”—a wonderful hour-long AM-radio broadcast, mastered from cassette, capturing the warmth and joy of Rev. Branch in both music (lots of it) and spoken message

KSE #333 (CDR album), ERNESTO DIAZ-INFANTE, “Tunnels” solo 12-string acoustic mantra guitar

KSE #318, ALFRED 23 HARTH & JOHN BELL, “Camellia”

Thanks for your support as we are in our 12th year of operation, dedicated to forward-thinking music and poetry. Our next summer release will be the album from Samuel Dunscombe and Tim Olive, in early-to-mid August….although you can order an advance copy NOW for immediate delivery. See you then….

July 29, 2017

The Mysterious Airman (1928 serial, Sprocket Vault DVD)

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 3:53 pm

mysterious

From the mid-1910’s through the mid-1950’s, the multi-chapter movie serial entertained millions weekly here in North America. During the VHS era, one could amass a good collection of sound-era serials….Republic Pictures Home Video issued high-quality copies of Republic’s serial library, various public domain companies issued the serials of Nat Levine’s Mascot Pictures, and grey-market “collector” copying services offered the serials of Universal and Columbia. While Olive Films has been releasing some of Republic’s serials, and of course the ever-reliable Grapevine Video has never stopped putting out good quality versions of various public domain serials, both silent and sound, here in the DVD/Blu-Ray era, the go-to source for quality restoration and release of serials, including many super-rare silent serials, has been The Serial Squadron, which you can visit at http://www.serialsquadron.com

However, it’s always an event when a lost serial surfaces, and for me it’s even more of an event when it is a silent serial. Serials were huge in the late 1910’s and throughout the 1920’s, and in the genre’s early years, many of its biggest action stars were women, starting with the Queen of the Serials, Pearl White. In this case, the lost serial is the 1928 THE MYSTERIOUS AIRMAN, surfacing in a beautiful print presented by The Sprocket Vault, the new organization run by film archivist and vintage film authority Kit Parker, who for many years released his product through VCI.

THE MYSTERIOUS AIRMAN is a 1928 (meaning late-silent) serial, produced by the Weiss Brothers, best-known to serial lovers for the amazing trifecta of CUSTER’S LAST STAND, THE CLUTCHING HAND (certainly in my top 5 most entertaining serials of all time), and the BLACK COIN in 1936. They also produced the serials for Columbia during that studio’s first year of serial production, 1937 and 1938 (and Grapevine recently released their Columbia serial JUNGLE MENACE, which is highly recommended).

THE MYSTERIOUS AIRMAN is a wonderful find on many levels. First of all, I have never before seen a silent serial produced by the Weiss Brothers. Many of their two-reel silent comedy shorts survive, and the ones with Snub Pollard are must-see comedy. This serial is quite well-done, and while their sound serials often have an “old-fashioned” quality to them, it’s because they were hearkening back to THIS period of film-making–it’s great to see a prime piece of exciting serial product from the time that they were later echoing!

mysterious airman

The plot is one which will be familiar to serial fans from such later releases as Mascot’s THE WHISPERING SHADOW (with Bela Lugosi) or THE SHADOW OF THE EAGLE (with John Wayne) or THE MYSTERY SQUADRON (with Bob Steele)—-a company/inventor is under attack by sinister forces to steal its intellectual property/business, and there are both cut-throat competitors out to shut them down AND a diabolical evil overlord who wears a mask (or is obscured in shadows) and is secretly one of the persons involved with the business. The various characters, except for the hero and heroine, are all at one time or another presented as red herrings to create mystery and suspense, and the many attempts to kill the good guys and gals and/or to derail the company and/or to steal the invention create fine opportunities for cliffhanger endings, which are resolved at the beginning of the next chapter with some piece of information or some camera angle not included at the end of the previous chapter.

Those who enjoy such action-filled serial entertainment will want to get a copy of THE MYSTERIOUS AIRMAN as soon as possible. It is a ten-chapter serial, in excellent condition, and all that is missing is one reel (about half) of chapter nine, and because of the nature of the serial format, some stills and an explanation of what happens during that half-of-a-chapter is quite adequate to fill the gap. The piano score by Andrew Earle Simpson is suitably 1920’s sounding while also laying back and never getting in the way, yet at the same time pulling the viewer along and suggesting moods….it DOES NOT telegraph emotions or plot movement the way some soundtracks do. We are also treated to a commentary track by film historian Richard Roberts, who did a fine job  with his commentaries on Kit Parker’s releases of the Lippert/Hammer UK crime films with imported American stars, released in a number of volumes under the HAMMER NOIR label. Roberts provides a history of the Weiss Family’s rich history in genre films, talks about all the cast and crew, talks about the filming and locations, provides context for the film, and also is knowledgeable about planes and aviation, which adds a lot to our appreciation of the film and the excitement of flying (then, still a novelty) to audiences of the 1920’s (remember, this film was issued the year after Charles Lindbergh’s historic trans-Atlantic flight).

mysterious airman 2

I have a job where I take home a lot of work each night, and many evenings I do not have time for a feature film….and I can’t stand today’s television. A serial episode or two is EXACTLY what I need to wind down after a long day, providing escapist thrills and exciting situations, much like pulp magazine stories or adventure comics or adventure radio programs, the other and similar popular entertainment offerings of the 1920’s and 1930’s. Film being a visual medium, the silent serials are in some ways even more entertaining than sound serials—-they certainly can’t be accused of being overly talky! I’ve watched probably a dozen silent serials thanks to Grapevine and The Serial Squadron, and THE MYSTERIOUS AIRMAN is an excellent quality entry for today’s serial fan. Again, the print is excellent, often tinted, and is so sharp it looks like it was shot yesterday. The actors—-led by serial stalwart Walter Miller, star of King of the Kongo and some early sound serials, who later graduated into character roles, often villains, using the gravitas he’d earned during his leading-man days in serials and action films—-and actresses all fill the hero and villain and grey-area roles quite well, there is a lot of flying footage (though, as the commentary points out, no real “air battles” or crashes, but do you really expect them in a low-budget film), it’s well-paced, and the location shooting (and most of this is shot at existing locations) of 1920’s Southern California is fascinating and beautiful. Just as in the low-budget comedy shorts of the 1920’s, you see priceless footage of a Southern California long gone, the Southern California that attracted millions of migrants and showbiz hopefuls.

If you are a fan of classic action serials, or low-budget independent genre films of the 20’s and 30’s (and if you are not a fan, it’s never too late to become one!), THE MYSTERIOUS AIRMAN is a wonderful find….and an all-around quality presentation. Hats off to the Sprocket Vault for this release, which I’ve already viewed three times and have treated various family members and visiting friends to chapters of. Check out the Sprocket Vault website at http://thesprocketvault.com and your order will be promptly fulfilled by Amazon. BTW, I highly recommend their HAMMER NOIR series (mentioned above) and their many FORGOTTEN NOIR releases, with little-known low-budget crime gems from the Lippert Pictures library, films I grew up watching on UHF channels 27 and 38 with snowy reception on a 12″ B&W television. Also, fans of the Weiss family’s films should check out Kit Parker/VCI’s releases (available through the Sprocket Vault) of silent comedy shorts on WEISS-O-RAMA, of the 1949-50 CRAIG KENNEDY: CRIMINOLOGIST television series, based on the stories of Arthur B. Reeve, who wrote THE MYSTERIOUS AIRMAN, and whose Craig Kennedy character was featured by the Weisses in their amazing 1936 serial THE CLUTCHING HAND, and also the jaw-dropping patchwork 1945 release WHITE GORILLA. Make a point to order all of those next payday!

The renewed interest in serials in the last few years is long-overdue. Trust me, THE MYSTERIOUS AIRMAN is a true find and well-worth the time and money of anyone who admires the spunk and creativity of the folks who make low-budget action films, then or now. Also, you’ll learn pretty much everything you could ever need to know about the Weiss family’s many decades in film. Highly recommended!

July 25, 2017

4th in the series of Natchez poems, TIME CRYSTALS from Bill Shute (KSE #380)

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 2:10 pm

note: I’ll be doing a poetry reading at San Antonio’s ARTPACE on Aug 5th, 7 pm

the fourth release from the recent poems written in Natchez, Mississippi

BILL SHUTE, “TIME CRYSTALS” (KSE #380, poetry chapbook)

time crystals cover

edition of 41 hand-cut, hand-assembled copies

$6 US postpaid / $7 elsewhere postpaid

payment via paypal  to     django5722(at)yahoo(dot)com

please leave note with your order letting me know which items you are ordering and your mailing address…..thanks!

I composed SEVEN six-page poems during my two weeks in Natchez, Mississippi, in May 2017, and here is the fourth one to be edited and formatted: TIME CRYSTALS. The other three will come out gradually throughout the year, and I also hope to record all seven later this summer for 2018 release. As usual, it’s open-field poems filtered through the consciousness of a narrative persona who is up to his waist in the muck, but looking toward the horizon (I’d say stars, but these were written during the daytime)—-JUNK SCULPTURE FROM THE NEW GILDED AGE.

Pausing at the southern crossroads, filled with midwestern wonder….another sunrise, another blank page to be filled with both activity and indolence….the fireflies avoid the potted plants….shaving the dead skin from my heels….saving my last clean shirt for an event I can’t anticipate….creamy-white sand crystals drop through the hourglass….paid to return to our furnished rooms, sleeping through the light.

These seven pieces written in Natchez will eventually be collected in a full-sized professionally printed book, but as always, the home-made KSE chapbook publication is the only publication in the original formatting, with the original art, with the original epigraph (this time from actor Montgomery Clift), and in the intended form of its creation. There are only 41 copies….grab one now, while you can.

Each of these chapbooks is a stand-alone piece (the “serial poem” concept of Jack Spicer seems to fit my work well), so don’t worry about what order they are in. I consider each narrator to be a unique person telling his/her unique story from his/her unique perspective. I as poet am just the actor playing the part, the gallery-operator assembling the exhibition.

I hope you find it interesting and worthwhile. Thanks for your reading all these years!

Also available, for the same price:

($6 US ppd/$7 elsewhere ppd)

KSE #378 (poetry chapbook), BILL SHUTE, “Meltdown,” 3rd of the Natchez poems

KSE #376 (poetry chapbook), BILL SHUTE, “New Jerusalem,”  2nd of the Natchez poems

KSE #374 (poetry chapbook), BILL SHUTE, “Guest Register,” 1st of the Natchez poems

KSE #366 (poetry chapbook), BILL SHUTE, “Approaching The Apparent: Meditations on the Kena Upanishad”

KSE #368 (poetry chapbook), BILL SHUTE, “Find A Place To Die”

KSE #367 (poetry chapbook), BILL SHUTE, “Left-Handed Cherubs”

ATTENTION, CENTRAL TEXAS READERS: I will be doing a solo reading, including some of the Natchez poems, and also a poetry-and-percussion piece by composer Dane Rousay—-an adaptation of my 2010 poem “Butterfly Mind”–at the Right Now Experimental Music festival, sponsored by KRTU-FM, and held at Artpace, on August 5th. The festival runs all day, and my set should be at 7 pm….save the date if you are able to make it to S.A. With KSE artists such as Dane Rousay and More Eaze also on the bill, it should be an exciting day. See you there!

July 24, 2017

BORDER OUTLAWS (1950), starring Spade Cooley and Bill Edwards, directed by Richard Talmadge

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 6:23 pm

border outlaws

BORDER OUTLAWS

directed by Richard Talmadge

starring Bill Edwards, Spade Cooley, and Maria Hart

released in 1950 by Eagle-Lion Classics

written by Arthur Hoerl (of Reefer Madness fame, who wrote dozens and dozens of very low-budget genre and exploitation films….when I scan his IMDB credits, I’m shocked to see that I’VE SEEN MOST OF THEM!)

border outlaws 2


The other two westerns that “starred” Spade Cooley–THE SILVER BANDIT and THE KID FROM GOWER GULCH–are usually thought of as some of the worst westerns of the post-World War II era (along with some of the Sunset Carson westerns made in 16mm), and they are. They are as incompetently done on every level as such 30’s fodder as THE IRISH GRINGO or LIGHTING BILL (sic) or THE PHANTOM COWBOY. BORDER OUTLAWS, however, is nowhere near as bad. At its best, it’s about as good as one of the lower quality entries from Monogram at the same time–say, whatever would be considered the worst Whip Wilson western. Bill Edwards, a too-stoic actor who sounds like he might have been a radio actor before getting into film(although looking up his credits, I see that that is not true–he was a rodeo champ!), is the leading man and hero in the film (by the way, is the Bill Edwards credited for the 1969 experimental film A MARRIED COUPLE the same person??). Spade, of course, plays himself, the jovial owner of a dude ranch. He’s actually quite comfortable on screen this time and does not do a bad job. While I fast-forwarded through a few scenes (I initially saw this film back in the 80s) this time around, I think there is only one song, and it’s a horrible operetta sounding thing sung (or at least mouthed) by the leading lady in the film, Maria Hart, who had leading roles in a few other z-grade westerns in this period, and whose last credit is Nicholas Ray’s THE LUSTY MEN with Robert Mitchum. The film is directed by silent and early-sound action star and stunt whiz Richard Talmadge. He was second-unit director on many big Hollywood productions in the 50s and 60s, but his directing credits are mostly limited to small z-grade productions, including at least one shot in 16mm. I’ve always loved Talmadge’s features (THE SPEED REPORTER being a personal favorite), so it’s good to see him do an adequate job here (he also makes a brief appearance for about a second–don’t blink!). The film also features his brothers, THE METZETTI BROTHERS acrobatic team, who play ranch hands who for no reason at all work in outrageous acrobatic stunts into every chore they do on the ranch. Those who like this kind of thing should check out some of the films directed by Gianfranco Parolini (aka Frank Kramer), who also puts in irrelevant acrobatic antics where they are not needed (remember RETURN OF SABATA, anyone?). I like this technique–it’s like getting a circus act free for the price of the movie ticket! John Laurenz plays the same kind of Hispanic comic-relief role here as he did in two James Warren westerns as “Chito Rafferty” (paging Chris-Pin Martin!)– if Mr. Laurenz is himself Hispanic, I apologize, but he doesn’t sound very convincing to me. Bud Osborne is his usual reliable self as the sheriff. Overall, this is an average z-grade western, but it’s by far the least bad of Spade Cooley’s three “starring” westerns. The film actually stars Bill Edwards (who starred in his own z-grade westerns, none of which I’ve seen), but Cooley’s name and notoriety make this better known than any of Edwards’ own films. There’s not much music here and there’s not much camp value, so I can’t imagine the film having much appeal beyond fanatics who want to see all the obscure post World War II indie westerns that they can….and there’s nothing wrong with that!

border outlaws 3

July 22, 2017

Bat City Cinema presents a K. Gordon Murray double-bill from original 16mm prints in Austin, Thursday 27 July!

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 8:23 pm

curse 1

Are YOU ready for a psychedelic trip to the 5th dimension? I am. That line is the most outrageous ballyhoo (from the master of the form, K. Gordon Murray) in support of a black and white movie which was many years-old when Murray was still hyping it on the rural drive-in circuit, but you know what….I’d imagine that most everyone who sits through this double-bill would agree wholeheartedly that the films TOTALLY deliver on that promise. And now we can see TWO of Murray’s classic American versions of first-rate Mexican horror from the Golden Age screened from FILM here in Central Texas!!!!!

Here’s the FB announcement for this horror-exploitation film must-see event:

Bat City is back with another double feature of ultra rare genre goodness on 16mm! Two ghastly offerings of 60’s Mexican horror not screened in Austin for at least 50 years… if ever! This is probably your only chance to witness the haunting beauty of THE WITCH’S MIRROR and the pint-sized terror of the CURSE OF THE DOLL PEOPLE in glorious black & white on the big screen. Tickets are only $10! Movies start at 7:30 pm. Feel free to bring your own beer and snacks!

curse 2

When will we in South and Central Texas get another chance to see two original K. Gordon Murray Mexican horror imports screened from FILM prints? Well, maybe in six months if this screening does well, so PLEASE find room in your schedule this coming Thursday night! I’m driving up to Austin from San Antonio (75 miles each way), and I’m sure it will be well worth it. Yes, I’ve had these on video for decades, but nothing compares with screenings from film (and if they are on 16mm, they are probably prints made for local TV stations, which means they will be EXACTLY the way most Americans saw these back in the day, except they won’t be on a snowy UHF station seen on a 14″ TV screen!).

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BAT CITY CINEMA presents K. GORDON MURRAY’s

THE WITCH’S MIRROR and CURSE OF THE DOLL PEOPLE

THURSDAY 27 JULY

at AUSTIN STUDIOS, 1901 E. 51st St., Austin, TX 78723

show starts at 7:30 pm,  admission $10

BYOB (might I suggest a quart bottle of malt liquor…that’s what I’ll have)

curse 4

July 18, 2017

coming this Fall: BRIDGE ON THE BAYOU, a new book-length collection of 2016 poems composed in Louisiana

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 1:31 pm

Happy to announce that we will be releasing another 8″ x 10″ book-length poetry collection, in the tradition of last year’s DOWN AND OUT IN GULFPORT AND BILOXI, which has been very well received by readers and which sold out its first printing in about four months (it’s still available and will continue to be available through Amazon in the US, Canada, and Europe).

This one, BRIDGE ON THE BAYOU, will contain the five six-page poems I composed in St. Landry, Louisiana, staying on the banks of Bayou Teche, during May of 2016, which initially appeared as five separate 41-copy-edition KSE chapbooks, all of which are out of print:

      Bridge On The Bayou

      Revelation In Slow Motion

      Reconditioning

      Satori In Opelousas

      Scrapple

As with DOWN AND OUT, this collection will be edited/formatted by Wyatt Doyle of New Texture, and he did an amazing job on the earlier volume. The larger format truly captures the way these open-field poems were conceived, as much as I may love the standard 5 1/2″ x 8″ KSE chapbook format. The energized clusters of text can breathe and the silence between the stanzas can be better felt on this larger canvas.

BRIDGE SAMPLE COVER

Stay tuned for further details.

Those of you here in South or Central Texas should mark your calendars for Saturday 5 August, as I will be doing a reading/performance here in San Antonio at Artpace as part of the RATS NEST EXPERIMENTAL MUSIC FESTIVAL. It will be both a solo reading of recent work (including pieces composed in Natchez, Mississippi in May of this year, some of which you can get a copy of NOW in their KSE chapbook editions–check the pinned post at the top of  this page) AND a performance of a poetry-and-percussion piece composed by Dane Rousay which is an adaptation of my 2010 poem BUTTERFLY MIND….with yours truly reading and the composer on percussion. My reading/performance is in the early evening, but the entire festival should be worthwhile, and admission is only $5….it runs from 3 pm through midnight. See you there!

 

July 13, 2017

two remaindered Warhol exhibition catalogues from Jablonka Galerie

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 1:57 am

Many books are published which include Andy Warhol’s name in the title: biographies with an agenda by people who did not know him; memoirs by people who were a part of his orbit; critical works which attempt to shoehorn him or his work into the service of some critical theory; meanderings on his role in the sixties or as a prophet of the internet age or whatever. Some are worthwhile; many are not. What matters most to me is Warhol’s art, and as the man was a workaholic, there is a lot of it—-in fact, more than any of us (except those who worked alongside him) could have anticipated. Warhol was also a man who took a motif and explored it over and over with variations, and presented all of those variations for study and contrast. Imagine if a contemporary dramatist who is also a film-maker……for example, Neil LaBute….took one scene from one of his plays, and presented seven different versions of the scene, some with different lines, some with significantly different direction, maybe one or two which replaced one actor with another….and then presented filmed versions of those multiple scenes which added up to 150 minutes and presented that as a feature film. And then he did that with the NEXT scene and released THAT as a feature film a month or two later. And then took the whole play and wound up eventually issuing FOURTEEN feature films in a year, each consisting of one scene from the play in multiple versions. It would change our way of looking at a play and a feature film. Of course, he’d lose a lot of his audience that way, but those he kept would no doubt get much deeper into his craft, and he would actively change the way the audience watched the play and the way the audience felt about drama. It would also slow down things–we’d be forced to stop and smell the roses (we’re not discussing Warhol’s own films here, but the 1965 HORSE contained elements of that approach)….and while we were stopped, to COMPARE and contrast the roses, and ponder the nature of roses, etc.

Andy Warhol’s multiple variations on a motif lend themselves to that kind of appreciation, and thus a Warhol exhibition (or exhibition catalogue) which provides a deep study of a particular series or a particular approach can be quite enlightening. Perhaps the ultimate example of that idea could be found at the Dia: Beacon in Beacon, New York, where Warhol’s SHADOWS series (90+ works) was presented  in one large room from 2003-2014 (I had the privilege of experiencing it in 2011 and spent five or six hours in the room). Here is a pic from that exhibition:

warhol shadows pic

The Jablonka Galerie in Koln, Germany, has done a number of these deep investigations of related and little-known works among Warhol’s archive, and the reason I am writing this piece today is to alert you that the beautiful exhibition catalogues from two of these exhibitions seem to have been remaindered in recent months and are now available at fire-sale prices (one was 19 and one was 15, before I used sale coupons!) at some of the Half Price Books stores here in Central Texas. Each is from a limited edition of 1500 copies worldwide, and each is full of beautiful and original and relatively unknown Warhol pieces. I’ve spent a lot of quality time with these books, and I notice that some copies still are on the shelves at HPB. You’d better grab them fast!

The first is PORTRAIT DRAWINGS, from a 2001 exhibition. It includes 78 richly  reproduced hand-drawn sketches of people–some no doubt intended for use in portraits, but many which don’t seem to have been. Warhol always had a distinctive and expressive hand, going back to the late 1940’s, so these works are a pleasure. After the 78 drawings, we get four finished portraits, none of which I’d seen before, two of Jacques Bellini and two of Herman Hesse (the Hesse portraits will remind many of Warhol’s series TEN PORTRAITS OF JEWS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY, a favorite series of mine). The opening essay by Warhol’s longtime associate Vincent Fremont provides context for the works and an appreciation of Warhol as draughtsman.

warhol jablonka 1

Here is a picture from that exhibition:

warhol jablonka 3

The second book, HEADSHOTS, comes from a 2000 exhibition of 38 Warhol color portraits from 1972-1986. The ones from the 80’s, in particular, are fascinating as we see his technique evolve from the better known 70’s portraits. The exhibition (and thus book) also included an additional 21 hand-drawn faces from 1955-1960, most of which will be unfamiliar. To compare the late 50’s hand-drawn headshots with the later polaroid and silkscreen and painted portraits  from the 70’s/80’s really gives an insight into Warhol’s evolution…and reminds us also how much was consistent. The book opens with a witty and insightful essay from Bob Colacello on Warhol’s portrait business and what the portrait genre meant to him, on any number of levels.

warhol jablonka 2

What Mr. Warhol ate for breakfast, what TV shows he enjoyed, and who he slept with can be discussed by others who find that interesting. For me, the work is what matters and what will remain. Those who care about that work should check out these two books–I can’t imagine that exhibition catalogues published in a limited edition for fifteen-year-old exhibitions will be around long….I’m assuming the publisher’s remaining stock was sold off into the netherworld of remaindered books (which is why I see three sealed copies of each at various HPB stores in Central Texas). Buy it now, or pay someone big bucks later for it. Pour yourself a craft beer, put a late-period Chet Baker album on, settle back into a comfortable chair, and spend a few hours with one of these books. Warhol left an amazingly large legacy of individual works, and they are here for us to savor….and then, eyes opened, for us to re-emerge into the world. Thank you, Andy Warhol.

July 12, 2017

3rd in the series of Natchez poems, MELTDOWN from Bill Shute (KSE #378)

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 2:43 am

the third release from the recent poems written in Natchez, Mississippi

BILL SHUTE, “MELTDOWN” (KSE #378, poetry chapbook)

meltdown cover

edition of 41 hand-cut, hand-assembled copies

$6 US postpaid / $7 elsewhere postpaid

payment via paypal  to     django5722(at)yahoo(dot)com

please leave note with your order letting me know which items you are ordering and your mailing address…..thanks!

I composed SEVEN six-page poems during my two weeks in Natchez, Mississippi, in May 2017, and here is the third one to be edited and formatted: MELTDOWN. The other four will come out gradually throughout the year, and I also hope to record all seven later this summer for 2018 release. As usual, it’s open-field poems filtered through the consciousness of a narrative persona who is up to his waist in the muck, but looking toward the horizon (I’d say stars, but these were written during the daytime)—-JUNK SCULPTURE FROM THE NEW GILDED AGE.

It might be a good year for the roses, but the tracks deepen with each nightfall….and the path ends just this side of the parsley patch…..dry bones, dry fountains, dry sockets, dry eyes, dry wells….the blades were kept sharp, but the gears not oiled….the managers claimed their decisions were data-informed….just not by informed data! And let me introduce you to Miranda, who works in wealth management and collects shabby chic—-she offered me a pizza and cake supper, but I’ll pass if I have to listen to her brother’s conspiracy theories to get it. A greenish tint to the jalapeno pilsner….explosions in the shingle factory, viewed from someone else’s porch swing….the tourists didn’t notice, the locals no longer cared….

These seven pieces written in Natchez will eventually be collected in a full-sized professionally printed book, but as always, the home-made KSE chapbook publication is the only publication in the original formatting, with the original art, with the original epigraph (this time from Woodrow Wilson), and in the intended form of its creation. There are only 41 copies….grab one now, while you can.

Each of these chapbooks is a stand-alone piece (the “serial poem” concept of Jack Spicer seems to fit my work well), so don’t worry about what order they are in. I consider each narrator to be a unique person telling his/her unique story from his/her unique perspective. I as poet am just the actor playing the part, the gallery-operator assembling the exhibition.

I hope you find it interesting and worthwhile. Thanks for your reading all these years!

Also available, for the same price:

($6 US ppd/$7 elsewhere ppd)

KSE #376 (poetry chapbook), BILL SHUTE, “New Jerusalem,” 2nd of the Natchez poems

KSE #374 (poetry chapbook), BILL SHUTE, “Guest Register,” 1st of the Natchez poems

KSE #366 (poetry chapbook), BILL SHUTE, “Approaching The Apparent: Meditations on the Kena Upanishad”

KSE #368 (poetry chapbook), BILL SHUTE, “Find A Place To Die”

KSE #367 (poetry chapbook), BILL SHUTE, “Left-Handed Cherubs”

ATTENTION, CENTRAL TEXAS READERS: I will be doing a solo reading, including some of the Natchez poems, and also a poetry-and-percussion piece by composer Dane Rousay—-an adaptation of my 2010 poem “Butterfly Mind”–at the Rats Nest Experimental Music festival, sponsored by KRTU-FM, and held at Artpace, on August 5th. The festival runs all day, and my set should be in the early evening….more specifics in a week or two, but save the date if you are able to make it to S.A. With KSE artists such as Dane Rousay and More Eaze also on the bill, it should be an exciting day. See you there!

 

July 11, 2017

now available…MASSIMO MAGEE & JAMES L. MALONE, “the limits of the possible” (KSE #375)

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 11:30 am

MASSIMO MAGEE & JAMES L. MALONE, “The Limits of the Possible”

(KSE #375, CDR album)

$8 postpaid in the USA  (see below for foreign pricing and ordering instructions)

MASSIMO DUO 2017 COVER

Happy to welcome back saxophonist/composer/theorist-of-improvisation strategies MASSIMO MAGEE for his 6th album for KSE (he also appeared on both the 10th and the 11th KSE Anniversary compilations!), “THE LIMITS OF THE POSSIBLE,” where he is working in a duo with his fellow member of the Eddie Prevost workshop, guitarist JAMES L. MALONE. Magee’s KSE albums always generate a number of text messages and e-mails from listeners, starting with Brad Kohler’s text message a few days after he rec’d his copy of Magee’s 2011 Direct To Tape: “sign this man to a long-term contract, immediately!”

Magee approaches improvisation with the intellectual rigor of a scientist or a philosophy major, setting up situations and parameters and variables and then jumping into the deep end of the pool and losing all inhibitions, all the while totally aware of the specifics of the experiment. (Those wanting to explore improvisation further with Magee can check out his 26-cd set, available free as a download and with a fascinating 87-page book accompanying it, called COLLECTED SOLOS, a series of experiments with different approaches to improvisation as a discipline and as an artistic foundation on which one can build in unlimited directions…..it’s available at http://arraymusic.wordpress.com/ar15-collected-solos ).

Let’s let Magee himself discuss his newest album:

The Limits of the Possible

James L Malone – Electric Guitar

Massimo Magee – Alto and Sopranino Saxophones (electro-acoustic and otherwise)

Trial 1 – 29:48       Trial 3 – 20:53

“The music arises from a point of view that improvisation works best, from a political perspective, as an exemplar. As a necessarily niche activity with folk tendencies, it’s never going to be the site of any concrete revolutionary action but it can be (is, when done right) a symbol or small-scale demonstration of a non-hierarchical, egalitarian situation which accommodates the tensions between individual flourishing and group interdependence. But within that concept of individual flourishing lies its non-political importance: the ability of the individual player to continually interrogate their material to find new possibilities within it, continually testing, by means of repeated struggle, the hypothesis of its inexhaustibility and, in allowing the practitioner a glimpse of that inexhaustibility, opening up the potential for a transcendental experience.” Massimo Magee, London 2017

These two extended pieces of living-and-breathing sound sculpture are wonderful displays of duo-improvisation at its most symbiotic. Some sounds are clearly from Malone’s guitar, while others are clearly from Magee’s treated/extended saxophone, but 80% of the time we have this swirling dance of elements where the sound-source is not immediately evident to the average listener. Malone and Magee exist in a shared space and they create an incredibly wide variety of sounds. Each “trial” is like a core sample (or, if you will, a biopsy slice/sample) from a living, breathing sound-entity—-frankly, the only thing wrong with the album is that it’s not a 5-cd set with a dozen “trials,” but these tantalizing samples will, we hope, get you seeking out other works from Massimo Magee and James L. Malone. I’ve played the album about 20 times myself, as if I am walking around and studying a ten-foot tall, ten-foot wide contemporary sculpture, taking it in from different angles, watching the natural light play on the surfaces differently as time passes, changing my relationship with the sculpture….and having my relationship with the sculpture changed for me by an infinite variety of variables….within the limits of the possible.

Be sure to grab this exciting and satisfying CDR album ASAP….

MASSIMO MAGEE & JAMES L. MALONE, “The Limits of the Possible”

(KSE #375, CDR album)

$8 postpaid in the USA  (see below for foreign pricing and ordering instructions)

NOTE: ALL CDR’s  ARE NOW PRICED @ $8.00, postpaid in the US.

OUTSIDE THE USA , one album is $18.00 postpaid, first two albums are $20.00 postpaid, then $8 each postpaid after that—sorry, but it now costs almost $14 US to send one CDR overseas….you save A LOT by buying more than one—in fact, the price on an order of two or more HAS GONE DOWN!

1 album= $18, 2 albums= $20, 3 albums= $28, etc. Thanks for your understanding of this. The Post Office now charges $14.50 to mail ONE cdr without a jewel box to Europe or Asia!

Payment is via paypal, using the e-mail address   django5722(at)yahoo(dot)com   . It might be helpful for you to also shoot me an e-mail telling me you’ve sent funds and what items you want…or if you prefer, tell me what books/cdr’s you want, and I’ll send you a paypal invoice.

FOREIGN KSE FRIENDS: we have a lot of great albums to use for your second album, costing only 2 dollars more (!!!) than one album, due to the exorbitant foreign postage rates, which are pretty much the same for one or for four or five cd’s. Take advantage of that and get Massimo’s previous album MUSIC IN 3 SPACES, are new album of compositions for percussion from San Antonio’s DANE ROUSAY, the latest album by Ernesto Diaz-Infante “Manitas,” Alfred 23 Harth’s BERLIN ENSEMBLES, etc. See below:

KSE #373 (CDR), DANE ROUSAY, “Anatomize” (new for July 2017)

KSE #372, ERNESTO DIAZ-INFANTE, “Manitas” solo classical guitar

KSE #369, A. F. JONES, “FOUR DOT THREE TO ONE”

KSE #362, FOSSILS & BILL SHUTE, “Florida Nocturne Revisited”….new interpretations of Shute’s Florida Nocturne Poems

KSE #370, “KSE 11th ANNIVERSARY ALBUM” featuring newly recorded, exclusive tracks from members of the KSE family and friends: JEN HILL, VANESSA ROSSETTO, ERNESTO DIAZ-INFANTE, LISA CAMERON, BRIAN RURYK, FOSSILS, MORE EAZE, JOHN BELL, MASSIMO MAGEE, MATTHEW REVERT, STEVE FLATO

KSE #355 (CDR), MORE EAZE, “wOrk”

KSE #357 (CDR) SMOKEY EMERY / VENISON WHIRLED, “turning into”

KSE #363 (CDR) ALFRED 23 HARTH’s BERLIN ENSEMBLES

KSE #359 (CDR), TOM CREAN & MATT ROBIDOUX, “Blank Space”–cover art by Jennifer Baron

KSE #336 (CDR), ALFRED 23 HARTH, “Kepler 452b Edition”

KSE #351 (CDR), MASSIMO MAGEE, “Music In 3 Spaces”

KSE #350 (CDR) ANTHONY GUERRA / BILL SHUTE, “Subtraction” KSE  reissue of album originally released in 2011 on Black Petal Records, Australia 

KSE #335 (CDR album), REVEREND RAYMOND BRANCH, “Rainbow Gospel Hour…On The Air!”—a wonderful hour-long AM-radio broadcast, mastered from cassette, capturing the warmth and joy of Rev. Branch in both music (lots of it) and spoken message

KSE #334 (CDR album), BRIAN RURYK, “Actual Size…degress again” (sic)

KSE #333 (CDR album), ERNESTO DIAZ-INFANTE, “Tunnels” solo 12-string acoustic mantra guitar

KSE #318, ALFRED 23 HARTH & JOHN BELL, “Camellia”

Speaking of John Bell, our next release—-out around July 25—-is a new solo album from Mr. Bell, as with the new Dane Rousay album, it’s devoted to compositions for percussion. Stay Tuned….and as always, thanks for your support. Please share the word about KSE….we do not have a lot of money to work with, but we do the most with what we have…..just like most of our families nowadays!

MASSIMO DUO 2017 COVER

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