Kendra Steiner Editions

September 24, 2016

FOSSILS, “Camelot Towers” (KSE #353)

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 3:04 pm

FOSSILS

“CAMELOT  TOWERS” (KSE #353, cdr album)

13 tracks, approx. 41 minutes—-edition of 48 copies

a co-release with Middle James Co. (MJC #443)

on this album, Fossils were Daniel Farr and David Payne

fossils-camelot-cover

For the first of SEVEN Fall-Winter 2016 albums, KSE is proud to present our longtime friends, the only band that matters (to us), Hamilton, Ontario’s FOSSILS, with a newly recorded (Spring 2016) collection of sound sculptures that investigate the duo’s painterly interest in space and texture. While the sound varies from track to track, many of the pieces are piano-based, with sparse but clotted bursts and squiggles that suggest a Twombly painting in sound, mixing with what sounds like a slack-stringed guitar, played to bring out the metal of the strings. There’s also electronics on some tracks, which adds a nice electric-charcoal shading to those pieces. The telepathic interplay between Farr and Payne is superb on this album—-those who liked our duo album of last Fall by Tom Crean and Mike Barrett will also like this, though it’s very different.

As I write this on a hot September South Texas afternoon with a shadowy overcast sky and thunder rumbling somewhere in a neighboring town, and the wind wants to pick up but it can’t overcome the sense of dread and stillness, and no one wants to get up and do something, knowing it will be rained out, this FOSSILS music is the perfect soundtrack. Our environment sounds like a backward-run tape!

If you are new to FOSSILS, these gentlemen (with various other co-conspirators over the years) have been an important force in the DIY free-improv/noise community for many many years. When KSE branched into music, we knew FOSSILS had to be on our label. Their whole “junk sculpture” aesthetic and lo-fi approach has always seemed to me the perfect extension of the punk aesthetic. Really, is there anything more punk than, say, the Nihilist Spasm Band or the L.A. Free Music Society? I think not….

I spend a lot of time listening to FOSSILS music, and it’s always a sonic head cleaner, with (as stated above) a painterly attention to texture and shading and space. It is pure, it is always fresh, and it is four-dimensional sound sculpture of the highest order.

FOSSILS…..CAMELOT TOWERS (KSE #353)….the first of seven new albums coming from KSE between now and the end of the year….

Payment is via paypal, using the e-mail address   django5722(at)yahoo(dot)com   . It might be helpful for you to also shoot me an e-mail telling me you’ve sent funds and what books you want…or if you prefer, tell me what books/cdr’s you want, and I’ll send you a paypal invoice.

Cost in the USA is $8 postpaid.

OUTSIDE THE USA , one album is $18.00 postpaid, first two albums are $20.00 postpaid, then $8 each postpaid after that—sorry, but it now costs almost $14 US to send one CDR overseas….you save A LOT by buying more than one—in fact, the price on an order of two or more HAS GONE DOWN!

1 album= $18, 2 albums= $20, 3 albums= $28, etc. Thanks for your understanding of this. The Post Office now charges $13.75 to mail ONE cdr without a jewel box to Europe or Asia!)

NOTE: The new FOSSILS album should be available in about 3-4 weeks from Cardinal Records in Canada. It would probably be a lot cheaper for Canadian customers to wait and order direct from Cardinal Records, where this would be a domestic purchase, not a foreign purchase as it is from the US….

OTHER CDR ALBUMS STILL AVAILABLE:

KSE #336 (CDR), ALFRED 23 HARTH, “Kepler 452b Edition”

KSE #351 (CDR), MASSIMO MAGEE, “Music In 3 Spaces”

KSE #350 (CDR) ANTHONY GUERRA / BILL SHUTE, “Subtraction” KSE reissue of album originally released in 2011 on Black Petal Records, Australia 

KSE #335 (CDR album), REVEREND RAYMOND BRANCH, “Rainbow Gospel Hour…On The Air!”—a wonderful hour-long AM-radio broadcast, mastered from cassette, capturing the warmth and joy of Rev. Branch in both music (lots of it) and spoken message

KSE #334 (CDR album), BRIAN RURYK, “Actual Size…degress again” (sic)

KSE #333 (CDR album), ERNESTO DIAZ-INFANTE, “Tunnels” solo 12-string acoustic mantra guitar

KSE #331, “KSE 10th ANNIVERSARY ALBUM” featuring newly recorded, exclusive tracks from members of the KSE family: ALFRED 23 HARTH,  SARAH HENNIES, RAMBUTAN, VANESSA ROSSETTO, ERNESTO DIAZ-INFANTE, DEREK ROGERS, BRENT FARISS, MATT KREFTING, GRAHAM LAMBKIN, and MASSIMO MAGEE

KSE #328, LISA CAMERON & NATHAN BOWLES, “Liquid Sunshine” percussion duo

KSE #326, MORE EAZE (aka Marcus M. Rubio), “Abandoning Finitude”….cover art by Bob Bruno

KSE #322,  WEREWHEELS (Sir Plastic Crimewave & Dawn Aquarius), “Live, Raw and Psycho In Japan”

KSE #320, MIKE BARRETT & TOM CREAN, “Casual Luddites”

KSE #318, ALFRED 23 HARTH & JOHN BELL, “Camellia”

KSE #310,  MORE EAZE (Marcus M. Rubio), “Accidental Prizes”

KSE #293, MORE EAZE (Marcus M. Rubio), “Stylistic Deautomatization” (reissued)

 

 

…..

September 23, 2016

ADVENTURES OF A PROFESSIONAL CORPSE by H. Bedford-Jones (Altus Press)

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 2:02 am

ADVENTURES OF A PROFESSIONAL CORPSE

by H. BEDFORD-JONES

published by Altus Press

$11.95 paperback (postpaid in US—-also available in hardcover)

stories originally published in 1940-1941

corpse-2

Altus Press, one of my favorite small presses dedicated to quality reprints of classic magazine fiction of the first half of the 20th century, has devoted an entire series (which is ongoing) to the works of prolific Canadian-American author H. BEDFORD-JONES. Bedford-Jones (1887-1949), who was the master of any number of fiction genres (and also worked in journalism and poetry), created fascinating plots that pulled the reader in, selected just enough details to suggest a setting without getting bogged down in description, used dialogue to develop character but did not (at least in the pieces I’ve read) write dialogue-heavy stories and novels, and kept things moving. No wonder that he was so popular in his day, and his name appeared often on the covers of the magazines in which he appeared (though, like many very prolific authors, he also used a number of pseudonyms). His published works supposedly amount to 25 million words!

This particular book should win over a number of readers to Bedford-Jones’ work. It consists of four 20-page stories originally published in WEIRD TALES in 1940 and 1941, featuring the character of James F. Bronson, a man who (I won’t give away how he does it—-you need to read it for yourself—-I’ll just say that it’s convincing, in the manner of outrageous scientific explanations found in pulp fiction stories) is able to fake death. Yes, he is able to produce in his body conditions that will fool most doctors into believing he is dead, and he uses this ability (with the assistance of a doctor sidekick, who appears on the scene at just the right time in each story, although he is in on everything from the beginning) to make money by making himself available to those who require a corpse. He will not doing anything illegal (so he says), but his fee IS large and he winds up helping people in need. It may be fraud and deception, but it’s well-meaning fraud and deception.

Bronson himself is the narrator of the stories, and his way of confiding in the reader creates a kind of bond with us. These stories are the perfect length for escapist reading at the end of a long work-day and their appeal is similar to an hour-long Charlie Chan or Boston Blackie B-movie. The supporting characters in each story are well-drawn and realistic (and in some cases, quite sympathetic), there’s no wasted scenes or filler, and even a busy person can read a story in one sitting. This is imaginative mystery (as in mysterious, not as in murder mystery) writing at its best.

If you enjoy mystery fiction and this concept sounds intriguing, then you should pick this up. It’s only $11.95 for the paperback, and it’s postpaid in the USA. You can order it here:

http://www.altuspress.com/shop/adventures-of-a-professional-corpse-h-bedford-jones/

I’ve already read a few other volumes in Altus Press’ H. BEDFORD-JONES LIBRARY, and I look forward to further volumes. Who needs the internet when you can sit on your porch, enjoy the breeze, sip on an iced tea or a beer, and tag along with James F. Bronson, the Professional Corpse, as he fakes death for adventure and profit.

September 22, 2016

BARBARIANS ON BIKES (New Texture)

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 8:20 pm

BARBARIANS ON BIKES

published by New Texture (2016)

Edited by Robert Deis and Wyatt Doyle

available in both softcover (which I’m reviewing) and in a deluxe hardcover edition with 20 extra pages and higher-quality paper

barbarians-on-bikes-softcover

There’s always something interesting, unexpected, and exciting happening at New Texture. Just when you think you’ve got them pegged, they’ll throw you a curve with a gospel album, or a children’s book, or the memoir of an urban teacher….but it all somehow fits together, filtered through the unique curatorial consciousness and the keen eye of Wyatt Doyle (he’s also a superb photographer, and we’ve used some of his works for KSE album and book covers).

BARBARIANS ON BIKES is an entry in NT’s Men’s Adventure Library, and co-editors Robert Deis and Wyatt Doyle have previously worked on collections of sensationalistic, exploitative fiction from the pages of “Men’s Magazines” of the 1950s through the 1970s. This time around, they focus on the art and the ballyhoo of extreme biker-oriented covers and stories from such trashy magazines. This is quite an interesting genre….it combines the pulpy, seamy side of cheap detective magazines with the racy color and adolescent fantasy world of the “adventure” pulps of earlier decades, mixed with the imagery and tone of the “roughie” exploitation films. It’s the perfect reading for some small-town guy working at a tire shop looking for an escape from the drudgery of dirty ten-hour work days and going home to a grungy furnished room he’d be embarrassed to bring a date home to….or the 18-year old stuck in the army overseas or in some isolated post in the rural US separated from family and friends and needing a cheap thrill that won’t require him to later get a shot of penicillin.

Deis and Doyle have assembled 100+ pages of sweaty, colorful, violent, sleazy images and  taglines from an underbelly of American publishing that does not get celebrated yet filled a void in many lives for decades. It’s wall-to-wall over-the-top Biker Sleaze from an era when people still read “fiction” (whether or not it was being passed off as first-person reportage or memoir).

I’m too young to have been much of a reader of this stuff during its heyday, but I did get to own a few as a child, which I kept somewhere in my closet. At the “Convenient Food Mart” down the street from me when I was 8-11 or so, I would buy comics with the covers ripped off from the store’s “private” backroom for a nickel, or even less. These were books that merchant sent back the covers on to get a credit from the publisher, and they were supposed to destroy them, but the temptation to make a few extra illicit bucks by selling  them to regulars who’d keep their mouths shut was too great (these small shop-owners work on a small profit margin)  As a kid who was a regular customer, a known quantity to the merchant, someone who bought comic books but had little money (I always paid in change), I was the perfect mark for the “hey kid, I’ve got some cheaper things in the back room here, want to take a look” sales pitch. The comics were in one pile or box (it’s too long ago to clearly remember), but maybe ten feet from there were the “adult” trashy mags like TRUE ADVENTURES or MAN’S CONQUEST or FOR MEN ONLY. I know I was too young to buy, or even look at these things, but a few times when I was left alone in the back room to forage through the comics, I did slip one of these in with my comics, and when the clerk tallied up my total, he saw them and never said a thing. Just charged me my sixty-two cents, or whatever. I later traded these ripped-cover men’s sleaze mags to someone for comics while in junior high school, but I do remember that they had a grungy, forbidden quality to them….and I was so young, the adult content meant little to me. I preferred the action to the sex at that age.

Looking through this collection at the covers that managed to capture so much action and so much promise, it’s amazing what your fifty cents would buy. Like a carny or an exploitation film, your money would take you into the world behind the curtain, and like those, the product often did not live up to the hype, but that did not matter. For a brief period, you’d gone over some imaginary line into a realm of danger.

Hardcore porn and explicit gore films pretty much killed this genre by the mid-70’s, and these mags used to glut the flea markets and seedy junk stores of the 1980’s. I probably skimmed past hundreds if not thousands of them looking for Charlton Comics or old issues of CREEM, but now, like so much that was once thought to be disposable, the mags are actively collected, people talk online about assembling complete runs of various mags, etc.

However, no need to dirty your hands or bid on Ebay…..the cream of the genre has been collected here in all its noisy and garish glory. With so many outrageous titles on every cover, you can create your own stories in your mind: PLEASURE CABIN GIRLS OF THE HIGH SEAS SIN ROUTES; RAMPAGING OUTLAW ANGELS AND THEIR LOVE-BLAST MAMAS; THE BIKE BRUTES; TEEN KICKS OF THE HELL-ON-WHEELS SEX SET; DEATH RUN THROUGH BLOW-UP ALLEY.

In an attractive, quality 8×11 format with eye-popping color and outrageous combinations of sleaze-and-violence terms mixed together in the story titles, this book definitely delivers a lot of bang for your buck. It certainly gets MY highest recommendation.

The publisher’s announcement for the book can be found here:  newtextureblog.blogspot.com/2016/09/barbarians-on-bikes-unleashed-in-two.html

And after reading that write-up, you can go directly to Amazon and order a copy here:  https://www.amazon.com/Barbarians-Bikes-Motorcycle-Adventure-Magazines/dp/1943444153/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1474596972&sr=1-1&keywords=barbarians+on+bikes

It also makes a great gift. I may well buy a copy or two for the 1960s-1970s sleaze-loving friends in my life. Another winner from New Texture’s Men’s Adventure Series, and there are some more fine editions in the series coming in the next year….stay tuned!

September 18, 2016

new Bill Shute poetry chapbook: BRIDGE ON THE BAYOU (KSE #352)

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 6:21 am

BRIDGE ON THE BAYOU

new poetry chapbook from BILL SHUTE (#1 of 5 in the Arnaudville Poems series, composed in Louisiana in May 2016)

KSE #352 (poetry chapbook)

$6 postpaid in US / $7 postpaid elsewhere

payment via paypal to django5722(at)yahoo(dot)com

please include a note with your order listing what item you are ordering and also your mailing address (which paypal often fails to provide me)….thanks!

bridge-bayou-cover

“The spring was nothing new to him, nor its sounds, its perfumes, its colors; nor was its tender and caressing breath; but, for some unaccountable reason, these were reaching him today through unfamiliar channels.” –Kate Chopin, An Easter Day Conversation

After a lot of planning/organizing/note-taking (which I always do for each work—-one cannot get any useful construction done without a blueprint and without first laying a foundation) during spare minutes in the Spring of 2016, I hit the ground running when I finally got my almost-two-week “writing vacation” on Bayou Teche, on the south end of Arnaudville, Louisiana, in St. Martin Parish, in the second half of May 2016. Enjoying strong black tea each morning on a floating dock on the bayou, watching the sun come up, I worked hard  into the afternoon and then again in the late night…and managed to produce  FIVE six-page poems, of which BRIDGE ON THE BAYOU is the first. Each is a collage of images filtered through a different narrative persona, reflecting an invented but likely narrative set in that area, presented in the open-field style….core samples of the state of things and of consciousness circa 2016, postcards from the front, junk sculpture from the New Gilded Age. If you are new to my poetry (and greetings to those who saw my reading at TYCA-SW or who stumbled across DOWN AND OUT IN GULFPORT AND BILOXI on Amazon or elsewhere), my technical roots are in Paul Blackburn, Ted Berrigan, Larry Eigner, mid-to-late 60’s Robert Creeley, Diane Wakoski, and late-period W. C. Williams—-although I have taken that ball handed off to me by the poets of earlier generations and run with it in my own directions toward my own goals. My first book-length work, from 2005, was 12 GATES TO THE CITY: THE LABOURS OF HERCULES IN THE LONE STAR STATE (published by Word Mechanics), a twelve-part journey along the Interstate-10 corridor from Lake Charles to Las Cruces, though mostly here in Texas, which treated the source legend of the classical Hercules and his 12 labours the way I felt that Jean-Luc Godard had treated KING LEAR in his little-known adaptation from 1987, a work which was a huge inspiration. It’s been a long, strange trip for me since then, issuing over a hundred five-to-eight page poetry chapbooks, another book-length work (Point Loma Purple), and operating the music-and-poetry collective Kendra Steiner Editions, which has released over 350 albums and chapbooks and which has carved out a significant international presence in that time. Over the coming months, I’ll be rolling out the five volumes of the Louisiana poems in small, handmade KSE micro-editions (such as this one); eventually, they will be collected in one volume, as the Gulf Coast poems of summer 2015 have been collected in the DOWN AND OUT IN GULFPORT AND BILOXI volume. However, the home-made 5 1/2″ x 8″ KSE chapbooks are always the intended form for these works, presented in the manner in which I imagined them, with the original artwork, epigraphs, etc….so I would recommend grabbing the original versions while you can, as they will never again be available in this form after this 3-6 month window of publication.

The words, phrases, and stanzas float on the page; the insects, dirt, leaves, and broken twigs float downstream on Bayou Teche. If you are new to the world of post-Projective Verse poetry composition, I recommend reading the following essay, “Projective Verse: The Spiritual Legacy of the Beat Generation,” by Paul E. Nelson: http://paulenelson.com/organic-poetry/spiritual-legacy-of-the-beat-generation/

BRIDGE ON THE BAYOU….energized particles of language and consciousness with the taste of central Louisiana….six pages, six fields, six assemblages, six “portholes of consciousness”…..thick pine smoke in our eyes, already moist with tears….husky patriots armed with dogwhistle jargon meet behind the rose hedges….her brother had become inattentive at his job at the meat processing plant, consumed with his quest to find a cache of treasure buried in a brass bucket by retreating French pirates two centuries past….detached, but not indifferent….manifestations of Siva on the horizon….hard trials & great tribulations….

BRIDGE ON THE BAYOU….first of five volumes of the Arnaudville, Louisiana poems….edition of 51 copies….get your copy NOW…..$6 US / $7 elsewhere

also available, for the same price, released in the Summer,

LUIS 2016

MAKE THE LIGHT MINE

11 new poems from LUIS CUAUHTEMOC BERRIOZABAL

KSE #364 (poetry chapbook)

BRIDGE is the first of KSE’s Fall-Winter 2016 releases…..we should be offering (fingers crossed) SEVEN new albums and the FIVE previously mentioned chapbooks with the Louisiana poems…..our first new album for the season will be CAMELOT TOWERS from FOSSILS, and then BLANK SPACE from the duo of TOM CREAN and MATT ROBIDOUX….the Fossils album should be out in a few weeks….stay tuned.

Got seven minutes to kill? Watch the video of my poem OUTFAKE, recorded in Pittsburgh in 2013 by Jim D. Deuchars:   https://youtu.be/8eTUJPU_eqI

As always, thank you all for your friendship and support over the years….

bayou-pic

August 28, 2016

now available in North America: ANTHONY GUERRA/BILL SHUTE, “SUBTRACTION” (KSE #350)

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 5:48 am

ANTHONY GUERRA & BILL SHUTE

“SUBTRACTION”  (KSE #350, cdr album)

guitar and poetry, originally released in 2011 on Black Petal Records, Australia

(ordering info at the bottom of this post)

SUBTRACTION 2016 cover

Very excited to announce the KSE reissue of the acclaimed guitar-and-poetry album SUBTRACTION, originally released on the Australian “Black Petal” label in 2011. I’ve recorded 6 or 7 poetry and music albums, and my voice has appeared as a “guest” on other people’s albums, but SUBTRACTION is to me the best of them all, and the one I give to people as representative of my work. Australian guitarist ANTHONY GUERRA was a perfect collaborator who totally “got” the feel and texture and sound of the poems. Anthony and I worked out the details long-distance (me in Texas, him in Japan, where he was living at the time), and then Derek Rogers recorded my poetry tracks, which we then sent to Anthony, and he recorded guitar parts to complement the words. These were poems, most of them Texas-set, which I was doing in readings in 2010, and Anthony’s sparse, aching, “high and lonesome” guitar work perfectly complements those qualities found in the poems. Anthony had been living in Japan for a few years at this time, and there is definitely a koto-like quality to his guitar work, while others have found a Jandek or a Loren Connors-kind of feel to it. One could not speak English and have no idea what my poems were saying, yet by my delivery and Anthony’s music, they’d “get” the feel of the pieces. I grew up listening to the poetry and jazz albums of Jack Kerouac and Langston Hughes, and also the John Cage/David Tudor INDETERMINACY album, and you’ll hear all of those as influences here. There are not that many worthwhile poetry and music albums out there today; give this one a chance. The German “Bad Alchemy” magazine recently compared the album to the Wim Winders film “Paris, Texas,” and if that comparison intrigues you, you’re probably the perfect audience for the album. My poetry has evolved in the years since SUBTRACTION, but I still work some of these into my readings today, and the opener “Marion, Texas,” I still use as an ice-breaker when reading to an unfamiliar audience. It works.

Working on this album with Australian guitarist-composer ANTHONY GUERRA was an honor. I was a devoted listener to his music, and one his 2009 album with Mark Sadgrove called IRON SAND inspired one of my poetry chapbooks….I still consider IRON SAND one of the great albums of the second half of the 2000 decade. Here is a brief bio Anthony provided:
Anthony Guerra is from Sydney, Australia.

He currently plays in Love Chants, Vavenge, Galah Galah Galah, Mysteries of Love, Mysteries of Love, Life Groove Orchestra, Your Intestines, Antipan, Vodka Sparrows, Desert Luck, and in a duo with Patrick O’Brien.

He has released music on labels including Quemada, RIP Society, Alberts Basement, Breakdance The Dawn, Chemical Imbalance, Ftarri, Digitalis, and PseudoArcana.

He runs the label Black Petal.
Black Petal can be found online at-
www.blackpetal.com
https://soundcloud.com/black-petal

He previously ran the label TwoThousandAnd (with Michael Rogers).

KSE is proud to offer the first American release of SUBTRACTION, a work deeply planted in the soil of contemporary Texas reality. If you are not familiar with my poetry, SUBTRACTION is an excellent entry point.

This is the last release from KSE’s Spring/Summer line-up, delayed from a planned July release. We’ll be back in September with a strong Fall/Winter release schedule, including new albums from FOSSILS, the duo of TOM CREAN & MATT ROBIDOUX, MATT KREFTING, MORE EAZE, the duo of LISA CAMERON & DANIEL HIPOLITO (aka Smokey Emery), and ALFRED 23 HARTH. Alfred’s album will close out 2016….then we’ll return in early 2017 with the KSE 11th Anniversary Compilation album, take a break to promote that properly, and return in the Spring with a series of excellent and surprising new releases, beginning with a new album from San Diego-based composer Alan Jones (of Laminal Sound fame), which I’m very excited about.

Don’t forget to score some of our other recent releases while they are still available.

CDR’s  including SUBTRACTION   $8.00 each, ppd. in US——-

OUTSIDE THE US, one album is $18.00 postpaid, first two albums are $20.00 postpaid, then $8 each postpaid after that—sorry, but it now costs almost $14 US to send one CDR overseas….you save A LOT by buying more than one—in fact, the price on an order of two or more HAS GONE DOWN!

1 album= $18, 2 albums= $20, 3 albums= $28, etc. Thanks for your understanding of this. The Post Office now charges $13.75 to mail ONE cdr without a jewel box to Europe or Asia!

KSE #336, ALFRED 23 HARTH, “Kepler 452b Edition”

KSE #318, ALFRED 23 HARTH & JOHN BELL, “Camellia”

KSE #351 (CDR), MASSIMO MAGEE, “Music In 3 Spaces”

KSE #350 (CDR) ANTHONY GUERRA / BILL SHUTE, “Subtraction” KSE reissue of album originally released in 2011 on Black Petal Records, Australia 

KSE #335 (CDR album), REVEREND RAYMOND BRANCH, “Rainbow Gospel Hour…On The Air!”—a wonderful hour-long AM-radio broadcast, mastered from cassette, capturing the warmth and joy of Rev. Branch in both music (lots of it) and spoken message

KSE #334 (CDR album), BRIAN RURYK, “Actual Size…degress again” (sic)

KSE #333 (CDR album), ERNESTO DIAZ-INFANTE, “Tunnels” solo 12-string acoustic mantra guitar

KSE #331, “KSE 10th ANNIVERSARY ALBUM” featuring newly recorded, exclusive tracks from members of the KSE family: ALFRED 23 HARTH,  SARAH HENNIES, RAMBUTAN, VANESSA ROSSETTO, ERNESTO DIAZ-INFANTE, DEREK ROGERS, BRENT FARISS, MATT KREFTING, GRAHAM LAMBKIN, and MASSIMO MAGEE

KSE #328, LISA CAMERON & NATHAN BOWLES, “Liquid Sunshine” percussion duo

KSE #326, MORE EAZE (aka Marcus M. Rubio), “Abandoning Finitude”….cover art by Bob Bruno

KSE #322,  WEREWHEELS (Sir Plastic Crimewave & Dawn Aquarius), “Live, Raw and Psycho In Japan”

KSE #320, MIKE BARRETT & TOM CREAN, “Casual Luddites”

KSE #310 (CDR) MORE EAZE (Marcus M. Rubio), “Accidental Prizes”

KSE #293  MORE EAZE (Marcus M. Rubio), “Stylistic Deautomatization”


NEWEST POETRY CHAPBOOKS:

($6 US ppd/$7 elsewhere ppd)

KSE #364 (poetry chapbook), LUIS CUAUHTEMOC BERRIOZABAL, “Make The Light Mine”

KSE #325 (poetry chapbook), BILL SHUTE, “Trickle-Down City Limits”

KSE #302 (poetry chapbook), BILL SHUTE, “Satori In Lake Charles”

Kendra Steiner Editions is now in our ELEVENTH year of operation and we’re up to around 350 music and poetry releases in that time. Thanks for your support over the years. Being devoted to formats such as hand-assembled, hand-cut poetry chapbooks and DIY CDR albums, which are always being written off as antiquated and/or obsolescent, is more difficult with each passing year, but we release PHYSICAL works which you can hold in your hand and which possess substance and texture and are ARTIFACTS. We’d like to think that some of the “spirit” of each releases is found in its three-dimensionality and the hand of the artist is always lurking.

The new FOSSILS album should be available in September….see you all then….

July 26, 2016

Get your KSE orders in by July 31st for immediate shipment (we’ll be gone August 1-12)

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 5:32 pm

Be sure to get your KSE orders in by JULY 31st. We will be in Southern Oklahoma from August 1-12, without internet access, and won’t be shipping again until August 13th. For the finest in eclectic, forward-thinking music and contemporary poetry….we’ve got LOTS of recent releases for you to choose from:

full-sized CDR’s ($8.00 each, ppd. in US——-

OUTSIDE THE US, one album is $18.00 postpaid, first two albums are $20.00 postpaid, then $8 each postpaid after that—sorry, but it now costs almost $14 US to send one CDR overseas….you save A LOT by buying more than one—in fact, the price on an order of two or more HAS GONE DOWN!

1 album= $18, 2 albums= $20, 3 albums= $28, etc. Thanks for your understanding of this. The Post Office now charges $13.75 to mail ONE cdr without a jewel box to Europe or Asia!)

KSE #336, ALFRED 23 HARTH, “Kepler 452b Edition”

KSE #318, ALFRED 23 HARTH & JOHN BELL, “Camellia”

KSE #351 (CDR), MASSIMO MAGEE, “Music In 3 Spaces”

KSE #350 (CDR) ANTHONY GUERRA / BILL SHUTE, “Subtraction” KSE reissue of album originally released in 2011 on Black Petal Records, Australia 

KSE #335 (CDR album), REVEREND RAYMOND BRANCH, “Rainbow Gospel Hour…On The Air!”—a wonderful hour-long AM-radio broadcast, mastered from cassette, capturing the warmth and joy of Rev. Branch in both music (lots of it) and spoken message

KSE #334 (CDR album), BRIAN RURYK, “Actual Size…degress again” (sic)

KSE #333 (CDR album), ERNESTO DIAZ-INFANTE, “Tunnels” solo 12-string acoustic mantra guitar

KSE #331, “KSE 10th ANNIVERSARY ALBUM” featuring newly recorded, exclusive tracks from members of the KSE family: ALFRED 23 HARTH,  SARAH HENNIES, RAMBUTAN, VANESSA ROSSETTO, ERNESTO DIAZ-INFANTE, DEREK ROGERS, BRENT FARISS, MATT KREFTING, GRAHAM LAMBKIN, and MASSIMO MAGEE

KSE #328, LISA CAMERON & NATHAN BOWLES, “Liquid Sunshine” percussion duo

KSE #326, MORE EAZE (aka Marcus M. Rubio), “Abandoning Finitude”….cover art by Bob Bruno

KSE #322,  WEREWHEELS (Sir Plastic Crimewave & Dawn Aquarius), “Live, Raw and Psycho In Japan”

KSE #320, MIKE BARRETT & TOM CREAN, “Casual Luddites”

KSE #310 (CDR) MORE EAZE (Marcus M. Rubio), “Accidental Prizes”

KSE #293  MORE EAZE (Marcus M. Rubio), “Stylistic Deautomatization”


NEWEST POETRY CHAPBOOKS:

($6 US ppd/$7 elsewhere ppd)

KSE #364 (poetry chapbook), LUIS CUAUHTEMOC BERRIOZABAL, “Make The Light Mine”

KSE #325 (poetry chapbook), BILL SHUTE, “Trickle-Down City Limits”

KSE #347 (poetry chapbook), BILL SHUTE, “Monumental Movements: Cassette Poems Three”

KSE #302 (poetry chapbook), BILL SHUTE, “Satori In Lake Charles”

Thanks for your support over these 10+ years. We’ll be back on August 13th. Any orders which come in during the period August 1-12 will be shipped on the 13th.

OK 1

Ardmore, Oklahoma

OK 2

Sulphur, Oklahoma

OK 3

July 23, 2016

The Norman Petty Trio: Complete Album & Singles Collection (Nor-Va-Jak 2-cd set)

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 4:50 pm

THE NORMAN PETTY TRIO

COMPLETE ALBUM & SINGLES COLLECTION

(Nor-Va-Jak, 2-cd set)

musical genre: lounge/cocktail
64 tracks – from the original mono master tapes
3 albums (Corsage / Almost
Paradise / A Petty For Your Thoughts)
1 EP – 14 singles
including 45 releases by Vi Petty & as the “Charlie Bee Combo” 

available from     http://superoldies.com/norvajak/CDs/trio/triocd.html

norman petty trio

I just rec’d my copy of this fine collection today and wanted to share my excitement about it. Before I say anything else, though, I need to point out that there is not one note of rock’n’roll on this album, even in the broadest definition of the term. Now that that’s understood…

Clovis, New Mexico’s NORMAN PETTY was one of the great rock’n’roll producer/engineers. While his name is most associated with Buddy Holly, he worked with hundreds of artists from all across the midwest and southwest….and a number of bands even came down from Canada to work with him, in the hope that some of the Petty magic would rub off on them. And more often than not, it did. Petty loved the studio environment and he was a great tinkerer, someone who was quite interested in the TEXTURES and COLORS of the sound. He had some kind of ideal sound in his head, and as a studio whiz, he worked with the musicians to get that special something onto tape. The exhaustive reissues of the Fireballs catalog over the years from Ace UK, as well as all their unreleased material which has come out, is a perfect case study for what Petty could do in the studio. With a master guitarist such as George Tomsco of the Fireballs, who could probably produce ANY imaginable sound or tone on his instrument, and the engineering/producing mind of Norman Petty, the large Fireballs catalog is one of the most interesting SOUNDING bodies of work in rock and roll. Like Link Wray or Bo Diddley or Duane Eddy, Tomsco and the Fireballs, with producer Norman Petty, created almost cinematic recordings that have held up decade after decade, and also recordings that because of the effort and quality put into them back in the day, still sound great in digital sound on today’s CD’s. I could go on for hours on this theme, as a lifelong fan of Norman Petty’s productions, but this post is devoted to a new reissue of Petty’s OWN music, the recordings of the NORMAN PETTY TRIO.

I had heard a scratchy 45 or two of theirs back in my active vinyl collecting days, but never heard much of their work, and when you think about it, you can’t really have a deep knowledge of Norman Petty without hearing his own recordings. The core of the group is Petty’s own organ (and other pre-synthesizer organ-like instruments) and his wife Vi on piano, with a few other instruments, usually gtr and drums and sometimes bass. The recordings were made between 1954 and 61 and were issued on a number of labels, RCA’s “VIK” subsidiary, Top Rank, ABC-Paramount, Columbia, Felsted, etc. Petty always licensed his productions to any number of labels, and perhaps those contacts were initially made during his Norman Petty Trio days. The group did have some national hits, and they have a very appealing sound. Yes, they are clearly in the “lounge” category, although some of the later sessions have a more pronounced beat and could be lounge answers to the instrumental records he was cutting with rock and roll combos. However, most of the music is the kind of thing you’d hear at a nightclub in a moderate-sized city, where couples who could afford it would dress up for the evening, drink martinis and various cocktails, perhaps have a steak and shrimp cocktail or an elegant salad or whatever, and dance to a band such as the Norman Petty Trio. This is really not jazz, although clearly Petty appreciated jazz, and he had the good taste to do Ellington covers among other jazz tunes. He was aiming, I’m guessing, at the audience who enjoyed Peter Nero or Carmen Cavallaro….cocktail music (Wikipedia calls this genre “light music”). While much of what we retroactively call “lounge music” is padded with strings and too much instrumentation, and has an instantly kitschy sound, the main selling point of the Petty Trio is their clean, sharp sound, a sound with a good amount of space and room to breathe. Even then, Petty understood that quality small group productions needed that space, and in these excellent transfers from the original MONO tapes, the three-dimensional but understated sound comes through beautifully.

Of course, we should give a lot of attention to Violet Ann Petty (“VI”), keyboard player on many Petty productions. She clearly has classical training, as I first discovered when ACE issued the unreleased Fireballs album BLUE FIRE. I’d be getting into an atmospheric Fireballs instrumental and suddenly this rhapsodic piano would come up and I’d be transported to some concert hall for 16 bars! Some of the material here has the flavor of the “light classical,” but mostly (on piano and celeste) she engages in a kind of counterpoint with her husband on organ—-in fact, it’s much like a couple dancing, Vi’s piano and Norman’s organ-work, one leading, one following, not getting in each other’s way, not stepping on any toes, being light on their feet, and being elegant and classy….and that’s EXACTLY what this music communicates, and surely what the supper-club audiences of the day would have wanted from the Norman Petty Trio.

Lounge music is not for everyone. However, if you had to make a case for the “cocktail music” genre, The Norman Petty Trio would be the artists to play for someone. There’s nothing campy or kitschy about this music. Although it is not jazz, it has all the good qualities one enjoys about a trio led by, say, Erroll Garner. The tempos are excellent for dancing, and as I stated earlier, it’s clean and understated and supple music.

It’s also very important to hear for the serious fan of Norman Petty’s productions. And it explains a lot about some of the “square” qualities that would surface on his productions from time to time. This album is 95% instrumental, but the few vocals show that his taste in vocalists would be in the manner of the Four Freshmen or Doris Day.

Again, this album is not for most people reading this post, but I feel an obligation to help promote this release, because it’s an important piece of the Norman Petty story, and for the person who enjoys lounge/cocktail music, it’s a real treat. There are 64 songs, all in fine, clear mono sound with a wonderful presence, and as an ABC-Paramount promotional ad included in the inside of the CD package reads, it’s “beautifully recorded.” Interesting to note that that’s how this music was sold in its day. These performances are the roots of Norman Petty’s musical universe. As such, hearing them clarifies a lot about his later work. Thanks to compiler Shawn Nagy for doing a superb job with this set. It’s as “classy” in that old school sense as the music on the discs.

petty 45

July 15, 2016

new poetry chapbook from Luis Cuauhtemoc Berriozabal, “Make The Light Mine” (KSE #364)

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 2:16 pm

MAKE THE LIGHT MINE

11 new poems from LUIS CUAUHTEMOC BERRIOZABAL

KSE #364 (poetry chapbook)

$6 postpaid in US / $7 postpaid elsewhere

payment via paypal to django5722(at)yahoo(dot)com

please include a note with your order listing what item you are ordering and also your mailing address (which paypal often fails to provide me)….thanks!

LUIS 2016

While contemporary poetry has painted itself into a corner in many ways and gets less relevant and more self-validating by the month, we’re all fortunate that independent poets such as LUIS CUAUHTEMOC BERRIOZABAL continue on, oblivious to trends. Luis has appeared in more than a hundred literary magazines, both online and print, and has a number of chapbooks, including seven from KSE since 2006 AND he was one of five featured poets in our POLYMORPHOUS URBAN: POEMS FOR LOU REED collection from 2014. Also, when we did the KSE 9th Anniversary event in Dallas last year, I read selections from three of KSE’s core poets over the years: the late Doug Draime, John Sweet, and Luis.

Two years is too long without something from him in print here, so I approached Luis about doing another chap of new work for KSE, and he graciously presented me with about 50 recent poems, all gems, and from those I selected 11 and sequenced them in a varied and ever-surprising running order, which serves as an excellent introduction for those unfamiliar with his work….and a fresh and exciting re-acquaintance for his many devoted readers.

Luis is certainly in the international lyric poem tradition, a tradition that is consistently being refreshed and remaining relevant. I know that when I am “introducing” someone to poetry, trying to get someone as excited as I am about poetry as an art form, I will often give that person a bilingual edition of Neruda. There is no pretentiousness there in his work—-just a depth and an elegance and an understanding of life, with lines constructed from the things of everyday life. Whatever one’s culture or time period, the work of someone like Neruda or Cavafy or even W. S. Merwin transcends walls and artistic movements and political situations to speak from heart to heart, from soul to soul. It provides a poetic hand extended from the page to the reader, ready to take you along.

Luis Cuauhtemoc Berriozabal writes beautiful lyric poetry that uses unadorned language and an understated voice to pull the reader IN to his world. His use of the “poet” narrative persona is masterful and never calls attention to itself. The speaker is a poet, the way another man might be a chef or an auto mechanic or a carpenter, and he uses the tools of his trade to understand the world….and to make the world a little bit more understood for those who read his work. His poetic voice is calm but his content can deal with the tragedy and loss and pain of life, and often there are subtle non-sequiters or the narrator expresses delusional tendencies. There is also a kind of incantatory quality developed from everyday detail—-the kind of thing one can find in, say, Gertrude Stein or Toni Cade Bambara’s works. Luis’s poetry grows out of….and creates on the page….a world full of orange groves and gravel roads and dimly-lit furnished rooms and half-melted ice cream cones and unshaven grandfathers….and longing for a better tomorrow. Reading Luis’s poems (and they always read well ALOUD too) reminds one why poetry does matter to real people living real lives. Thus, KSE is proud to present this new collection from a contemporary voice that deserved to be heard, to be pondered, to be savored. LUIS CUAUHTEMOC BERRIOZABAL.

Luis is also a master of “voice” as an entryway into character. In his day-job, Luis is a professional whose position requires him to LISTEN to a lot of people, to read between the lines of what they say, and to anticipate their needs and what they are REALLY trying to say….or trying to avoid saying. He brings that kind of sensitivity to his work–each poem is spoken by  characters whose language defines their worlds and their thought processes. You are inside their heads, seeing through their eyes, and USING THEIR VOCABULARY AND THEIR SYNTAX when you are within the world of one of Luis’s poems.

Whenever I speak with Luis, he is always introducing me to a Latin American or European lyric poet I’ve never heard of, or ONLY heard of but not read, and I’m always the richer for it. I wish he had a blog where he discussed his voluminous reading!

Get your own copy of MAKE THE LIGHT MINE, 11 new poems from Luis Cuauhtemoc Berriozabal…..only $6 US / $7 elsewhere, postpaid. Ordering information at the top of this page.

KSE also offers many other chapbooks of contemporary poetry and CDR albums of experimental music. Check the “available” page on the top right of your screen.

As always, thanks for your interest and support over KSE’s ten years!

———————————————————————–

previous KSE poetry chapbooks from Luis Cuauhtemoc Berriozabal (all out of print)

KSE #59, Luis Cuauhtemoc Berriozabal, “Without Peace.”

KSE #82, Luis Cuauhtemoc Berriozabal, “Keepers of Silence.”

KSE #100, Ronald Baatz & Luis Cuauhtemoc Berriozabal, “Next Exit: Seven.”

KSE #103, Luis Cuauhtemoc Berriozabal, “Garden of Rocks.”

KSE #122, Luis Cuauhtemoc Berriozabal. “Still Human.”

KSE #141, Luis Cuauhtemoc Berriozabal & Cynthia Etheridge, “Overcome.” 

KSE #174,  Luis Cuauhtemoc Berriozabal, “Digging a Grave.”

KSE #272 (poetry chapbook) POLYMORPHOUS URBAN: POEMS FOR LOU REED, featuring new Reed-inspired poetry from LUIS CUAUHTEMOC BERRIOZABAL, JIM D. DEUCHARS, MICHAEL LAYNE HEATH, A. J. KAUFMANN, and MATT KREFTING. Art by David Payne.

July 14, 2016

thoughts on Jack Kerouac’s ‘Wake Up: A Life of the Buddha’

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 1:47 pm

Since my teenage years in the 1970’s, Jack Kerouac has been an author whose work has meant a lot to me. While I’m glad that On The Road brought him fame and continues to bring him new readers, it was never a favorite of mine as I preferred his more structurally innovative works such as Tristessa, Visions of Cody, The Subterraneans, Desolation Angels, and posthumous works such as Some Of The Dharma (confession: I have not read the “teletype scroll” version of On The Road—-that may well be quite different from the one we all know). Although I am a poet and not a fiction writer, Kerouac’s work has had a great impact on me…beginning in my youth when I carried around a copy of Tristessa in my back pocket. After all, I have written THREE poetry chapbooks inspired by Satori In Paris (one, SATORI IN LAKE CHARLES, has been published—-the other two should be out within the next year). Presently, I am re-reading Desolation Angels, and within the first ten pages, I had a flash of insight:  closely observed details of the immediate environment, juxtaposed with images and situation from memory but retold with a bit of license and some of the details changed, juxtaposed with spiritual musings, held together with stream-of-consciousness flow….hey, that’s EXACTLY what I’m doing with many of my poems!

Also, one of the great values of Kerouac’s work for future generations is the unflinching candor of the narrative persona. Kerouac’s persona in many of his works reflects many of the less-than-desirable qualities and biases of 20th century American males. I’m not sure whether the author viewed his narrator in that manner, and Mr. Kerouac might well consider that a revisionist take on his work, but it’s an inevitable outgrowth of his emphasis on candor and on unpacking the different levels of the self on the page (in other words, there is a strong mid-20th century male chauvinist vibe to much of Kerouac’s work which could be off-putting to readers, especially female readers….best to ascribe those qualities to the narrative persona, analyze them, understand the views of that time better, and not use them as an excuse to ignore the other 95% of the work which is of much value).

Let’s move on, though, to the subject at hand in this post, Kerouac’s posthumously published WAKE UP: A LIFE OF THE BUDDHA. Kerouac spent a good chunk of time on this book and consulted many works to write it. He had the enthusiasm of a convert and no doubt worried about getting the details right. The superb introduction to the book by Prof. Robert A. F. Thurman perceptively observes that Kerouac tended to favor (and consult works from) the Mahayana branch of Buddhism (my own studies have been in that area, along with Chan Buddhism and Tibetan Buddhism), and for someone not brought up in a Buddhist-dominant culture and who was not a comparative religion major and who did not have access to the internet, Kerouac should be lauded for producing an excellent lay-person’s guide to the life of Prince Siddhartha Gautama and the tenets of that view of the universe and of consciousness.

I first read the book soon after its publication, and initially I found it somewhat disappointing. I’m not sure I finished it, even. Clearly, it had been cobbled together from sources, something which Kerouac did not deny, so in a sense it was the Jack Kerouac paraphrase of this material. However, in the true “erase the ego” spirit, little of Kerouac’s individual character is left. Of course, that was not the function of this work–it was meant to be a factual study and a text meant to convert–so I perhaps should not attack it for not being what it did not set out to be.

I re-read the book a few years later, and DID finish it that time around. My main impression of the book at that time was that while it was a solid and interesting piece of work, it had the humorless over-sincerity of works by converts…..think Bob Dylan’s first-two “born again” albums. Or better yet, track down some of the audience recordings of live shows from Bob Dylan’s born-again live shows where he interacts with the audience. Kerouac and Dylan are both men of great wit and sarcasm and especially of grounding their work in the particulars of life as it is lived. When Dylan is composing songs dealing with religious generalities in a doctrinaire fashion, he is not doing what he is best at, what he is valued for. The same goes for Jack Kerouac.

Wake Up: A Life of the Buddha should convince anyone out there who still considers Kerouac an undisciplined writer (there are probably still a few) that he was a craftsman of great self-discipline. In fact, Wake Up often comes off like a commissioned project which was completed in a thoroughly professional manner.

A few weeks ago I finished reading the book for a third time as well as listening to the audio book. I don’t think I will be re-visiting the work again, unless I need to for research purposes. Again, it’s a solid and professional lay-person’s guide to the basics of the story of the Buddha. However, to be honest, this could have been written by any number of people. Yes, I do understand that to honor the material, Kerouac did want to erase the hand of the author, and that he did well, but it lacks the edginess, the groping for answers, and most especially, the grounding of spiritual ideas in lived experience. That is done far better in THE DHARMA BUMS or DESOLATION ANGELS. If you want Kerouac’s improvisations on many of the ideas in this book, done up in a playful and stylistically innovative manner, try the amazing SOME OF THE DHARMA, which is pure Kerouac, while dealing with many of the issues in this book in a weighty manner. Those books, and others, are what make Kerouac a great spiritual author. Kerouac was also a man who sought to unify faiths, insisting that there was common ground between Buddhism and Roman Catholicism. He was NOT a doctrinaire man. Wake Up presents a doctrinaire perspective in the dry and overly respectful manner of a recent convert. Kerouac the artist appreciated ambiguity. This book represents a period in his life when he sought to be a doctrinaire member of a particular faith. It’s interesting as a cul-de-sac in his life and career, but there’s little here that anyone who knows Buddhism 101 is not already familiar with.

An innovative, open-ended literary work such as SOME OF THE DHARMA provides a lifetime’s worth of reading and material to chew on. A novel such as DESOLATION ANGELS shows Kerouac doing what he did best….integrating lived experience and rich detail with spiritual groping. I can return to it every few years and find new insight in it…and also enjoy the rich details of the journey and the flow of the voice. And THE DHARMA BUMS presents the same Buddhist agenda as Wake Up but does it in a much more human and contemporary (and artful) method….a method which, ironically, will result in many more people being brought into the Buddhist fold, if that was indeed Kerouac’s intent.

Those of us for whom religious traditions are mostly of value for the metaphors they provide or for their cultural significance will find little of permanent value and little that is distinctly Kerouac in Wake Up: A Life of the Buddha. It’s great to have it finally in print, and it fills an important gap in the man’s life and writing career, but I won’t be keeping it close at hand as I do SOME OF THE DHARMA and DESOLATION ANGELS, and I won’t be mentioning it the next time I am explaining Kerouac’s significance and value.

wake up

July 13, 2016

new from ALFRED 23 HARTH, “Kepler 452b Edition” (KSE #336)

Filed under: Uncategorized — kendrasteinereditions @ 2:42 pm

ALFRED  23  HARTH

“Kepler 452b Edition”

An allegory of life in an alien area

CDR album, KSE #336

full-sized CDR’s ($8.00 each, ppd. in US—

OUTSIDE THE USA , one album is $18.00 postpaid, first two albums are $20.00 postpaid, then $8 each postpaid after that—sorry, but it now costs almost $14 US to send one CDR overseas….you save A LOT by buying more than one—in fact, the price on an order of two or more HAS GONE DOWN!

1 album= $18, 2 albums= $20, 3 albums= $28, etc. Thanks for your understanding of this. The Post Office now charges $13.75 to mail ONE cdr without a jewel box to Europe or Asia!)

Also, please note the new policy for foreign orders, which is unfortunate but necessary, as it now costs us $13.50 to send ONE album overseas. The new pricing policy actually saves overseas customers money when buying two or more albums, and saves you more the more you buy, as compared with our previous pricing. Thanks for your understanding. This is a low-overhead operation and we try to keep YOUR costs as low as possible.

Payment via paypal to  django5722(at)yahoo(dot)com

Please include a note with your paypal order including the items ordered AND your mailing address (which Paypal often fails to provide me)….thanks!

A23H KEPLER

Excited to welcome back ALFRED 23 HARTH for another KSE release. Mr. Harth’s work for KSE since 2011 has been a sustained and wildly eclectic body of work, both solo and with a wide variety of world-class collaborators. This new multi-layered solo creation, KEPLER 452-b EDITION, a Suite in 29 parts, “an allegory of life in an alien area,” grew out of Mr. Harth’s creating a track for the KSE 10th Anniversary album (which is still available–check the ordering page to your upper right). It makes sense that a man whose career has been spent going beyond boundaries and whose work is rooted in the post-human would take his sound-art into a parallel/alternate universe. Go back and listen to A23H’s “Just Music” album from 1969. It’s not like ANYTHING else coming out of that era….and that’s pretty much been the story ever since. Even when he works with someone with a well-established style such as Paul Bley or David Murray, they sound different when in an ensemble with Alfred 23 Harth.

As with Harth’s previous KSE album “China Collection,” what we have here with KEPLER-452-b is a series (29, to be exact) of short pieces which can be approached in a variety of ways. Think of them as sound-transmissions from that parallel/alternate universe. The distant signal fades in on the first track and fades away as the album concludes. As Mr. Harth is also an acclaimed visual artist, perhaps we can also think of this as an exhibition of 29 minutely-detailed small pieces. The listener can approach the album many ways. I took KEPLER with me to the Louisiana bayou last month and listened to it a number of times in a number of ways in that rural area beyond the reach of the internet and outside the range of cell phones. First, I played the album straight through a few times to get the layout of the terrain, then I put the album on “random” and experienced the tracks in different playing orders, savoring the new juxtapositions. THEN I did what I had done with the China Collection album: put each individual track on “repeat” and appreciated the structure, the multi-layered construction of the sound collage. Each piece is unique and an exercise in miniature sound sculpture, with tiny details (the kind of tiny details which pull one in) worthy of an artwork by Wols. Were I banished to the proverbial desert island for a year and A23H’s KEPLER was the only music I was allowed, I daresay that I would not get tired of it and I would not have explored ALL of its depths. Maybe after the 500th listen I could pontificate on the nature of the Keplerian culture that produced these sound sculptures! Yes, I am quite impressed with this album!

Listeners got a first taste of the KEPLER project when Mr. Harth sent a track (an exclusive track NOT on this new Kepler 452-b album!) for our KSE 10th Anniversary compilation album (which is still available, by the way). He got so into the project that he created an entire new album. As A23H explains,

Kepler-452b Edition:
Bill Shute asked me if I would like to contribute to the KSE 10th anniversary compilation in 2016. I started working on some tracks to have a multiple choice and after a while I had created a strange music movie in the head and thought of designing these remixes for a new CD. While finishing this plan NASA announced the news about an earth cousin Kepler-452b Edition on July 23rd in 2015 feeding all sorts of speculations & imaginations about this planet. The music of the CD Kepler-452b Edition could be a projection of those. I grew up in times of Jazz & Space Age – how would life sound if I grew up on earth’s cousin?
A23H, July MMXV

We’re honored that Alfred 23 Harth has chosen to share a number of his recent creations through KSE here in South Texas. I have followed Mr. Harth’s work for 40+ years, since hearing CANADIAN CUP OF COFFEE as a teenager in Colorado, but every one of his unique creations is an equally valid entry-point to his work….so why not start now! And yes, Harth’s acclaimed saxophone work is woven into the fabric of this album, so those who seek that fix will not be let down…get your copy NOW!

Please get your order in before AUGUST 1 as KSE will be closed from AUGUST 1-AUGUST 12 while we are in Oklahoma. We’ll open for orders again on August 13. Thanks. Don’t forget to pick up other A23H albums along with your copy of KEPLER:

Also available by ALFRED 23 HARTH on KSE:

KSE #331, “KSE 10th ANNIVERSARY ALBUM” featuring newly recorded, exclusive tracks from members of the KSE family: ALFRED 23 HARTH,  SARAH HENNIES, RAMBUTAN, VANESSA ROSSETTO, ERNESTO DIAZ-INFANTE, DEREK ROGERS, BRENT FARISS, MATT KREFTING, GRAHAM LAMBKIN, and MASSIMO MAGEE

KSE #318, ALFRED 23 HARTH & JOHN BELL, “Camellia”

And while picking up your fix of A23H music, why not check out some of KSE’s other CDR albums of forward-thinking music!

full-sized CDR’s ($8.00 each, ppd. in US—outside US minimum order of TWO albums….first two albums are $20.00 postpaid, then $8 each postpaid after that )

KSE #351 (CDR), MASSIMO MAGEE, “Music In 3 Spaces”

KSE #350 (CDR) ANTHONY GUERRA / BILL SHUTE, “Subtraction” KSE reissue of album originally released in 2011 on Black Petal Records, Australia 

KSE #335 (CDR album), REVEREND RAYMOND BRANCH, “Rainbow Gospel Hour…On The Air!”—a wonderful hour-long AM-radio broadcast, mastered from cassette, capturing the warmth and joy of Rev. Branch in both music (lots of it) and spoken message

KSE #334 (CDR album), BRIAN RURYK, “Actual Size…degress again” (sic)

KSE #333 (CDR album), ERNESTO DIAZ-INFANTE, “Tunnels” solo 12-string acoustic mantra guitar

KSE #331, “KSE 10th ANNIVERSARY ALBUM” featuring newly recorded, exclusive tracks from members of the KSE family: ALFRED 23 HARTH,  SARAH HENNIES, RAMBUTAN, VANESSA ROSSETTO, ERNESTO DIAZ-INFANTE, DEREK ROGERS, BRENT FARISS, MATT KREFTING, GRAHAM LAMBKIN, and MASSIMO MAGEE

KSE #328, LISA CAMERON & NATHAN BOWLES, “Liquid Sunshine” percussion duo

KSE #326, MORE EAZE (aka Marcus M. Rubio), “Abandoning Finitude”….cover art by Bob Bruno

KSE #322,  WEREWHEELS (Sir Plastic Crimewave & Dawn Aquarius), “Live, Raw and Psycho In Japan”

KSE #320, MIKE BARRETT & TOM CREAN, “Casual Luddites”

KSE #310 (CDR) MORE EAZE (Marcus M. Rubio), “Accidental Prizes”

KSE #293  MORE EAZE (Marcus M. Rubio), “Stylistic Deautomatization”

ALFRED KEPLER PHOTO

An excellent interview with ALFRED 23 HARTH can be found here:  http://www.asymptotejournal.com/interview/an-interview-with-alfred-harth/

And Mr. Harth’s own website can be found here:

http://alfredharth.blogspot.com/

Next Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.